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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by A-FRIEND on May 17, 2017, 07:14 PM »
This is an interesting look into the life of a slave cook at Belle Grove plantation.
A couple things to look for.

We've talked about the difference in legacies between white and black generations. That's discussed here.
We've talked about black history and how one has to ferret out details here and there to complete the story. That point is handled very interestingly here.
Even the title comes with explanations that only would make sense while referring to black history.

https://interpretivechallenges.wordpress.com/2016/09/26/kneading-in-silence/
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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by A-FRIEND on April 30, 2017, 05:47 PM »
The Mis-Education of the Negro - Carter Godwin Woodson

http://www.historyisaweapon.com/defcon1/misedne.html


Carter Godwin Woodson is considered by many to be the father of African-American history. The son of former slaves, in 1912 Woodson earned his Ph.D. in history at Harvard University, the second African-American to earn a doctorate – the first being W. E. B. DuBois.

Noting that African-American contributions ...were overlooked, ignored, and even suppressed by the writers of history textbooks and the teachers who use them, in 1926 he originated the concept of Negro History Week, which he set in the second week of February – which coincided with the birthdays of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. That week of recognition soon became largely accepted, and was eventually extended for the full month of February – becoming known as Black History Month.

The material that makes up The Mis-Education of the Negro was originally a series of speeches and essays delivered and written by Woodson in the late 1920s and early 1930s, which he collected into a book in 1933. It is still considered a classic piece of African-American writing and is widely referenced in high school and college classrooms.

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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by Mystic1 on April 27, 2017, 04:03 PM »


Dr. David Jones Peck (1826-1855) was the first African American man to graduate from an American medical school in 1847 from Rush Medical College in Chicago.

David Jones Peck was born to John C. and Sarah Peck in Carlisle, Pennsylvania around 1826. John Peck was a prominent abolitionist and minister who founded the local African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church in Carlisle. Peck was also a barber and wigmaker.

John and Sarah Peck moved to Pittsburgh in the early 1830s where they established the first school for black children in the area.  David was one of their first students.  Between 1844 and 1846 David Peck studied medicine under Dr. Joseph P. Gaszzam, an anti-slavery white doctor in Pittsburgh. After his two years of study with Gaszzam, Peck entered Rush Medical College, Chicago in autumn 1846, and graduated in 1847. During the summer after graduation, Peck toured the state of Ohio with William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass promoting abolitionist ideals.

In 1848, Peck established his medical practice in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He lived in and worked from a red brick row house with his wife, Mary E. Peck, whom he married in 1849.  When his medical practice in Philadelphia proved unsuccessful, he returned to Pittsburgh in 1851. Few doctors recognized his status, referred patients to him, or consulted with him. 

Peck’s old friend and fellow Pittsburgh abolitionist Martin R Delany, persuaded him to participate in an emigration project that would resettle U.S. free blacks in Central America. 

Delany, Peck, and other black emigrants moved to Nicaragua in 1852, settling on the east coast of the nation.  The emigrants established San Juan Del Norte with Delaney as the mayor and commander of the militia.  Peck practiced medicine and became the town physician.

In 1855 Peck joined the Liberal side in the Nicaraguan Civil War and was killed by cannon fire and died as the result of concussion injuries sustained in the town of Granada. Dr. Peck was buried in the town square of the city of Granada
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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by A-FRIEND on April 27, 2017, 12:49 PM »
Do you think you know how horrible slavery was?
Those of you that are incenses that confederate flags and monuments to those slavers are being tsken down, do you think black people  shoukd sit quietly and keep tolerating them?

Watch this. Them answer those questions again.


https://www.facebook.com/iloveAfrica.co/videos/1757729524492031/
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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by A-FRIEND on April 27, 2017, 09:22 AM »
Do you think you know how horrible slavery was?
Those of you that are incenses that confederate flags and monuments to those slavers are being tsken down, do you think black people  shoukd sit quietly and keep tolerating them?

Watch this. Them answer those questions again.


https://www.facebook.com/iloveAfrica.co/videos/1757729524492031/
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Genuine Alley Poetry and Prose / The Reality Of Rain
« Last post by Mystic1 on April 23, 2017, 05:15 PM »
And when it was day, he departed and went into a desert place... ~ Luke 4:42

the reality of rain
is that it speaks to each of us
in its own universal tongue –
billions of angelic echoes
whispered from the heavens;
a steady, graceful cacophony
pattering against surfaces
of this physical existence...
the white noise of a downpour
God’s voice in Morse Code
tapping at the hardness of the heart
gentle nudges pricking at the ears
signaling to inner struggles, hidden pain,
unconscious grievances –

it’s time to let go
it’s time to be washed of guilt,
unforgiveness, disappointment;
allow Love to find its path
to those desert places,
those cracked and exposed landscapes
that have become a balm for the soul

those places long desolate
remember them, nurture them,
make peace with them, release them
in the aftermath there is only silence
a holy, lingering brilliance and
the premonition of spring

~ G

April 22, 2013
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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by Mystic1 on April 21, 2017, 11:53 PM »
Living History: Portraying An Enslaved Woman

https://youtu.be/MVFdsqQby9o
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A-Friends Cafe / Re: Black History
« Last post by A-FRIEND on April 19, 2017, 12:00 AM »
Here's some food for thought. While you're reading this reflect on a couple of things. Reflect on how precedent set by the supreme court can do generational damage and who that primarily affects. Reflect on what some are defining as a riot and who they're trying to tag that on. And reflect on whether or not their has been any justice.

http://m.dailykos.com/story/2017/4/16/1650660/-The-Easter-Sunday-massacre-in-Colfax-Louisiana-and-the-awful-Supreme-Court-decision-that-followed
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