Author Topic: Black History  (Read 445701 times)

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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #392 on: August 30, 2008, 07:48 PM »
Wow!! What a great trip! I didn't know that they had a Titanic Museum. I'll bet that was fascinating!
I can do with a room full of blues. Just love it!
The only thing that I don't envy about your trip is the money part. I'll bet you unloaded a bunch, but the memories will be worth it.
I'm sure that there are some poems hiding deep down in that "criminal" mind!

Offline cappy

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Re: Black History
« Reply #393 on: August 30, 2008, 08:01 PM »
Witt and Friend: Two things

First going back a bit, I visited the pool we had talked about two weeks ago. The head of the pool from the recreation division of the city escorted me personally. I can't tell you what that meant. Anyway it was a strange emotion filled trip over 40 years till now.

Second, Friend, buddy I hate to do this. I know you and the gang had a really good time and all of you want to remember the good times. On the other hand here, on this board especially, you might consider, you know, telling us. . . .

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #394 on: August 30, 2008, 08:48 PM »
I'm waiting to see if the Chamber of Commerce is going to respond to me. Six working days will be next Tuesday. I wanted to put up their response at the same time. If they don't respond by then, I'll post the incident without it.
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Offline Allen

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Re: Black History
« Reply #395 on: August 31, 2008, 02:43 AM »
What a great vacation.  That is fantastic.   What is money for, but, to be spent to allow our women to shop?  Or so my wife has would have me believe.
Allen

An action promulgated out of desperation will inevitably end in tragedy; for as its anagram so aptly foretells:  A rope ends it. �

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #396 on: August 31, 2008, 02:49 AM »
Amen Allen. We are well trained aren't we.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #397 on: August 31, 2008, 08:16 PM »
Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche, an African born in Cap Haitien, Haiti May 26 1886. Not much is known about Joseph's young life, except he was a excellent student. At the age of 15 he decided he wanted to be an engineer. Haiti had no such schools so Joseph was sent to Beauvais, France in the company of a teacher the Lord Bishop of Haiti, Monseigneur Kersuzan. Joseph was allowed entry into to high school, excelled, and became a serious promising student in the engineering school.

Life went on and March 1908 Joseph married Juliette Lafargues, the only daughter of a white upper class wine seller. They set off on their journey through life with the expectation of finding good employment as there was many opportunities for a young man with his education and abilities, but the ugliness of racism was alive and well in France. He did find work, but was paid poorly, the excuse ranging from being too young or inexperienced. ( sound familiar?)

They made do for a time and a year later on Feb 19, 1909 a daughter, Simonne, was born. Another year passed and a second daughter was born prematurely July 2, 1910. She was named Louise and she had many health problems. Joseph and Juliette were dedicated to their children and could no longer except or live on the substandard wages he was being paid, because of the medical bills for Louise. By 1911 they decided to move back to Haiti for better employment. By that time Haiti was a growing nation and the opportunities for qualified engineers held much promise. The matter was discussed and the move was planned for 1913.

As fortune would have it Juliette discovered she was pregnant in March 1912. The trip was moved up to make it more comfortable on Juliette and Joseph's mother in Haiti bought the tickets as a welcome home present. The trip was booked for April 20 from Le Harve to New York and then to Haiti, but there was a complication. The ship had a policy that required children to stay in the nursery, even at meal times. Juliette and Joseph would have none of that, so they transferred to another ship and left tens days earlier on April 10, 1912. They would sail to Cherbourg, then to New York and then to Haiti and the beginning of their new life.

They were booked on second class passage, which was unsatisfactory to Juliette coming from an upper class family and being used to first class accommodations, but they made do.
Sailing day was sunny and pleasant. The accounts of their time on board becomes a little muddled at this point. Some accounts have them as quite sociable and excepted on the ship, other accounts say they were shunned because of Joseph's race.
I believe both could be true, as we see that even to this day, but it wouldn't matter in time. Just four days into the trip on April 14 the ship met with disaster. 
As Joseph put his pregnant wife and two daughters on the life boats he kissed them and said, I'll see you in New York.
They never saw each other again. Joseph, at the age of 26, died at sea.

Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche, the only black passenger, died  during the sinking of the Titanic.
In fact he was the only black person to die aboard the Titantic. There were no black workers on board. They were mostly Irish.
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #398 on: September 01, 2008, 03:16 PM »
Fascinating, FRIEND. I didn't know that. You teach me well.

I learned something yesterday that made my jaw drop that I must share. You KNOW how much I  love spirituals and the blues. Here's what I learned: American Negro spirituals were composed using the pentatonic, or five note, scale. This scale was referred to as the slave scale. Those are the black notes only on the piano. There is a video out there, youtube, I guess, where Wintley Phipps explains that spirituals were sung using only those five notes of this scale. He explains that the melody of the famous hymn Amazing Grace was West African. I believe that mostly everyone knows that the writer of the lyrics, John Newton, was the captain of a slave ship, who had repented. Credit for the melody is given as "unknown." Phipps does a wonderful rendition of the song! Perhaps you can find it. I don't have the "power" to watch youtube on my old pooter, but I was lucky enough to see it on TV. You may want to expound on this information.
I think that I shall now go play with the black keys on my piano!

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #399 on: September 01, 2008, 04:37 PM »
Thanks Witt for that insight.
Great minds think alike huh. I wanted to expand on just that topic and I had a lot of research on it, but found myself lacking the where-with-all to put it together, not being of a musical persuasion.

I deleted all my short cuts out of frustration, but I may go back and try again. Perhaps I'll just post the links, but I'll still need to explain what I'm trying to do.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #400 on: September 08, 2008, 05:23 AM »
Wednesday, August 27, 2008 - Subject: Star Jones' reply to Bill O'Reilly (FOX) about Mrs. Obama]




Say or think whatever you want about Star Jones but she got it right this time. Please Read!!!!!





Date: Wednesday, August 20, 2008, 5:43 PM

Star Jones Reynolds responds to Bill O'Reilly/Fox News about Michelle Obama!

Below is Star Jones' informed and provocative response to Bill O'Reilly's comment about 'having a lynching party for Michelle Obama if he finds out that she truly has no pride in her country.'

Bill O'Reilly said: 'I don't want to go on a lynching party against Michelle Obama unless there's evidence, hard facts, that say this is how the woman really feels. If that's how she really feels - that is a bad country or a flawed nation, whatever - then that's legit. We'll track it down.'


Star said: 'I'm sick to death of people like Fox News; host! , Bill< BR>> O'Reilly, and his ilk thinking that he can use a racial slur against a black woman who could be the next First Lady of the United States, give a half-assed apology and not be taken to task and called on his crap. What the hell? If it's 'legit,' you're going to 'track it down?' And then what do you plan to do? How dare this white man with a microphone and the trust of the public think that in 2008, he can still put the words 'lynch and party' together in the same sentence with reference to a black woman; in this case, Michelle Obama? I don't care how you 'spin it' in the 'no spin zone,' that statement in and of itself is racist, unacceptable and inappropriate on every level. O'Reilly claims his comments were taken out of context. Please don't insult my intelligence while you're insulting me. I've read the comments and heard them delivered in O'Reilly's own voice; and there ! is no r ight context that exists. So, his insincere apology and 'out-of-context' excuse is not going to cut it with me. And just so we're clear, this has nothing to do with the 2008 presidential election, me being a Democrat, him claiming to be Independent while talking Republican, the liberal media or a conservative point of view. To the contrary, this is about crossing a line in the sand that needs to be drawn based on history, dignity, taste and truth.

Bill, I'm not sure of where you come from, but let me tell you what the phrase 'lynching party' conjures up to me, a black woman born in North Carolina. Those words depict the image of a group of white men who are angry with the state of their own lives getting together, drinking more than they need to drink, lamenting how some black person has moved forward
(usually ahead of them in stature or dignity! ), and had the audacity to think that they are equal. These same men for years, instead of looking at what changes they should and could make in their own lives that might remove that bitterness born of perceived privilege, these white men take all of that resentment and anger and decide to get together and drag the closest black person near them to their death by hanging them from a tree - usually after violent beating, torturing and violating their human dignity. Check your history books, because you don't need a masters or a law degree from Harvard to know that is what constitutes a 'lynching party.'


Imagine, Michelle and Barack Obama having the audacity to think that they have the right to the American dream, hopes, and ideals. O'Reilly must think to himself: 'How dare they have the arrogance to think they can stand in front of this nation, challenge ! the st atus quo and express the frustration of millions? When this happens, the first thing that comes to mind for O'Reilly and people like him is: 'it's time for a party.' Not so fast...don't order the rope just yet.

Would O'Reilly ever in a million years use this phrase with reference to Elizabeth Edwards, Cindy McCain or Judi Nathan? I mean, in all of the statements and criticisms that were made about Judi Nathan, the one-time mistress turned missus, of former presidential candidate Rudy Giuliani, I never heard any talk of forming a lynch party because of something she said or did.

So why is it that when you're referring to someone who's� African-American you must dig to a historical place of pain, agony and death to symbolize your feelings? Lynching is not a joke to off-handedly throw around and it is not a metaphor that has a place in poli! tical c ommentary; provocative or otherwise. I admit that I come from a place of personal outrage here having buried my 90 year-old grandfather last year. This proud, amazing African-American man raised his family and lived through the time when he had to use separate water fountains, ride in the back of a bus, take his wife on a date to the 'colored section' of a movie theater, and avert his eyes when a white woman walked down the street for fear of what a white man and his cronies might do if they felt the urge to 'party'; don't tell me that the phrase you chose, Mr. O'Reilly, was taken out of context. To add insult to injury, O'Reilly tried to 'clarify' his statements, by using the excuse that his comments were reminiscent of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' use of the term 'high-tech lynching' during his confirmation hearing. I reject that analogy. You see Justice Thom! as did mean to bring up the image of lynching in its racist context. He was saying that politics and the media were using a new technology to do to him what had been done to black men for many years -- hang him. Regardless of if you agreed with Justice Thomas' premise or not, if, in fact, Bill O'Reilly was referencing it, the context becomes even clearer.

What annoys me more than anything is that I get the feeling that one of the reasons Bill O'Reilly made this statement, thinking he could get away with it in the first place, and then followed it up with a lame apology in a half-hearted attempt to smooth any ruffled feathers, is because he doesn't think that black women will come out and go after him when he goes after us. Well, he's dead wrong. Be clear Bill O'Reilly: there will be no lynch party for that black woman. And this black woman assures you that if! you co me for her, you come for all of us.'

-- Star Jones Reynolds


I posted this just as I recieved it. My comment, good for Star Jones!!!� I ,for one, am sick and tired of the racist blow hards like ORiely, Limbaugh, Hannity, ect, saying these types of things then offering a half hearted apology as if black people are to stupid to know what they're really up to.

I invite everyone to send this to all your email contacts.

 
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #401 on: September 08, 2008, 05:56 AM »
A couple post back I mentioned I was waiting on a respose from the Chamber of Commerce.

I wrote the chamber of Commerce of Branson, Mo. about an incident that happened while we were vacationing there. I wanted to put their response up with a description of the incident, but Branson's Chamber of Commerce has chosen not to respond.

As mentioned before, there were three couples of us on vacation together. We chose Branson, Mo because it's advertised as a family friendly fun place to be. On a tuesday night we all were at a putt-putt course located on one of the main streets, well lit, with a lot of traffic and plenty of people. Our group was at the third hole, street side, when suddenly we heard a loud pickup truck approaching. The jacked up 4-wheel drive red Ford with a Confederate flag and state flag flying from the rear stave holes. As these young white men drove by they yelled, "a bunch of back M---fs" at us. We were the only black couples there so it was no mistaking who it was directed at. One could pass that off as singular ignorance, but it wasn't but a few minutes that a black pickup truck of the same descript drove by and yelled, " a bunch of niggers" at us.

 I wrote the the Chamber of Commerce and told them I know they can't police every incident that happens, but these young men were in very public places doing this and they obviously had no fear of consequences. They did it with such ease that it tells me this has happened before and no one sees fit to make an example out of this kind of behavior.
There is no excuse to allow this kind of behavior to go on to the extent that these young men have no fear of punishment. We drove 1094 miles and spent good money just to have, not only us guys insulted, but to have our women endure the worst kind of insult you can direct against black people. But beyond that, there were white familys playing the course behind us, with small children, that were exposed to that kind of language.

I reminded the Chamber of Commerce that they advertise themselves as family friendly and I would presume that means black familys too.

Well they chose to ignore my email. After ten working days, one would think at least an acknowledgement would be forth coming. Their ignoring my email tells me they don't care one bit about those young men and that specific type of behavior. That being the case and based on this experience, it is my recommendation that Branson, Mo. be taken off any vacation plans.
I especially reccomend this to my black people. If Branson, Mo. sees no need to respect us, I see no need to spend our money there.
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Offline Marsupial Man

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Re: Black History
« Reply #402 on: September 08, 2008, 11:50 AM »
It never ceases to amaze me that there are people out there who so vehemently hate other people because of skin color.
There's so much I want to say, but I don't have the time to express it all.
Simply put, I hate racists. Maybe I'm reducing myself to their level by "hating" them, but I do. Certainly, when I encounter a four year old child who's been raised to use the Nigger word, it's sickening. It begs the question, will racism ever go away? I doubt it. Despite all of our progress as a society, too many people commit violence against those of another color just because of their color. The verbal assaults. Seemingly, it's never ending.  As you expressed in an earlier post, an apology just can't cut it.

Take care of yourself A-Friend,

PAul

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #403 on: September 08, 2008, 03:18 PM »
I appreciate your respose Paul. It amazes me as well. My father always taught us if you don't like some one, just leave them alone. It takes effort and energy to accost people you don't like, whereas leaving them alone requires zero effort.

I could tell you stories of when I was in law enforcemnt trying to save some racist from harm, even death at times, just to be blasted with all kinds of racial slurs. For the most part I can let it roll off, but I don't know a single man, including racists, that would stand by while their wife is being insulted.

You take care of yourself as well my friend.
Earl
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Offline 7

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Re: Black History
« Reply #404 on: September 08, 2008, 06:02 PM »


 I wrote the the Chamber of Commerce and told them I know they can't police every incident that happens, but these young men were in very public places doing this and they obviously had no fear of consequences. They did it with such ease that it tells me this has happened before and no one sees fit to make an example out of this kind of behavior.
There is no excuse to allow this kind of behavior to go on to the extent that these young men have no fear of punishment. We drove 1094 miles and spent good money, just to have, not only us guys insulted, but to have our women endure the worst kind of insult you can direct against black people. But beyond that, there were white familys playing the course behind us, with small children, that were exposed to that kind of language.

I reminded the Chamber of Commerce that they advertise themselves as family friendly and I would presume that means black familys too.

Well they chose to ignore my email.  After ten working days, one would think at least an aknowledgement would be forth coming. Their ignoring my email tells me they don't care one bit about those young men and that specific type of behavior. That being the case and based on this experience, it is my  recommendation that Branson, Mo. be taken off any vacation plans.
I especially reccomend this to my black people. If Branson, Mo. sees no need to respect us, I see no need to spend our money there.


A-Friend,

What else can be done? ACLU? Did you get their license plate number? Did you file an incident report with the local police?

I did a google search on Branson Missouri/ racism, first results, and first click I read this:

 From forty miles away in the neighboring state of Arkansas, the billboard with the portrait of Bobby Vinton, his eyes an eerie steely blue, beckons the roadside traveler. Soon the billboard faces are so frequent it is like watching an old-fashioned "movie" precursor, where you flip the pages of a book rapidly and it seems like the image is moving, the lady dances, the pinwheel spins. The long lost images of one performer after another ad infinitum applaud the wonders of the city ahead. Between the Lutheran churches and dusty flea markets on Route 65, hub of the Ozarks, home state of our president -- the enormous likenesses of people from a world you thought had long gone by decorated the highway alongside the proverbial dead skunks and other roadkill. Sidekicks from TV shows in the sixties, one-hit wonders of the early seventies, characters you didn't think actually existed -- except you keep hearing on late night commercials that they sold More Records than the Rolling Stones and The Beatles Combined (and no one could figure out where since no one in your neighborhood ever heard of them) names you thought you would never glance upon again, with the exception of an article entitled "Whatever Happened To..."; They are all here. You cross the state line. The celluloid roadside portraits reflect real people who are not only alive and well, they are stars here, replete with their names in huge, blinking, multi-colored neon lights. Welcome to Branson, Missouri.

I am from Boston; my family and I were city Yankees staying in northern Arkansas for the summer of l996. We had never heard of Branson, let alone had any awareness that it was the Las Vegas of the Bible Belt, the entertainment center of Middle America, with a strip to rival that of the infamous city in Nevada, albeit without the gambling, prostitution, or accepted consumption of large quantities of alcohol. This is, after all, a Christian city, and you will not forget that gambling and sex are still sins here. Although liquor is legally sold, you won't see anyone at a bar nursing their third martini without lunch. Many of the surrounding counties are dry, double shots are unheard of and alcohol is actually referred to as "booze." There will never be a movie called "Leaving Branson." The entertainment is strictly G-rated, suitable for the whole family. Nestled in between the numerous motels that line the highway (all of which feature pools with a view of the action on the Strip) are Go Kart tracks, miniature golf, skeeball joints, family dining with checkered tablecloths, Wal-Marts, waterparks, and theaters named after everyone you forgot or vaguely remembered died fifteen years ago of a disease that had foggy social ostracization capabilities even in trendy college towns.

There are no women with naked oversized breasts to appeal to your prurient pleasures. There are no same sex couples casually holding hands as they wait in line to bungee jump. A quick overview reveals there are no other races but the one that requires a minimum of SPF-15 sunscreen for protection. Diversity here means they have pancakes and waffles for breakfast.

Speaking of food, sushi is not an option. All-you-can-eat buffets (and it looks like many of the patrons did) with names like Dixie Stampede, are the norm. Danish pastries, English muffins, and French fried potatoes are as ethnic as it gets, with an occasional Chinese restaurant furnished with oversized Polynesian chairs and featuring exotic dishes with flames burning underneath the omnipresent eggrolls and spareribs accompanied by a scorpion bowl with six straws.

The local attitude is Southern Drawl friendly. No one will argue with your second amendment rights, although the fifth and eighth are subject to argument. The politics are definitely anti-commie and decidedly conservative. An eye for an eye, as the Bible says; the death penalty is big business in this territory (and abortion is not). Whether the defendants are juveniles or mentally incompetent is of no consequence. However an exception may be made for sports legends. The general opinion here is OJ was innocent, and justice was served; he was a great football hero which in Kansas City Chiefs country overrides the "problem" that he married a white woman and beat her for good measure.

The Confederate flag from that war -- etched in our consciousness by scenes from 'Gone with the Wind' but referred to here as "The War of Northern Aggression" -- the symbol of the Confederacy that was brought down by the surrender 131 years ago in Appomattox, the official banner of Dixie, lovingly referred to as 'Stars and Bars' here, still appears frequently on license plates and T-shirts. Indeed on the way up from Arkansas, past the towns with the confederate flag flying proudly over City Hall, almost a century and a half after that war was won by the Union (a fact which seems to have been forgotten), the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan adopted (represented by official state signs) part of highway 65 as part of their civic duty to clean up the litter.

This is Easy Rider country -- the End of Easy Rider country -- where one can imagine, even in l996, a freak with long hair and a red-white-and-blue-flag-painted vehicle -- especially if it had bumper stickers proclaiming tendencies toward and affiliations with social justice, environmentalism, Judaism, and Harvard -- could get you blown to smithereens by a Redneck in a pick up truck with a chip on his shoulder and a shotgun by his side. "Redneck" is not an insult here, but a label one wears with the dignity and respect the label "liberal activist" brings in the college-infested cities on the coasts.


Branson Missouri, population 3700. Each year this figure swells to accommodate 7 million middle-class patriotic tourists, from Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma as well as those in terminal Misery (as Missourans occasionally pronounce it), who come with their families (as well as tour busses for which Branson is the number one destination) and spend their time and money on that annual extravaganza immortalized � la Chevy Chase's Summer Vacation. And business is definitely thriving.

There are a total of five rush hours in Branson -- the usual commuter ones (the afternoon commute is made worse by the matinee traffic) -- as well as before and after showtime. Highway traffic is diverted down lesser traveled routes during peak jams at one-two PM, seven-eight PM and again at 10:30-11:30 when the last encore and jauntily-placed-straw-hat ragtime shuffle is finished and all the shows get out simultaneously. The traffic is bumper to bumper against the starlit sky and blinking neon for at least one third the distance of the Boston Marathon. Broadway move over! Branson has arrived!

The variety and number of shows is astonishing. In Boston, there might be three or four shows playing on any given night. In Branson, there are over fifty. Big names too. Remember Tony Orlando? He's here. (Dawn, however, seems to have been misplaced.) Ray "the Streak" Stevens? Yup. Steve Lawrence -- ex-husband-of-skier-killer-Claudia-Longet? Present. The Osmond Brothers play here every night with the second generation! Apparently even Wayne Newton has left Vegas for the glories and sequins of the midwest. Elvis, Marilyn, Roy Orbison, and Michael Jackson impersonators perform every night next to the wax museum and Ripley's Believe It or Not, and they are not considered Camp, but Respected Entertainers to be taken seriously. Anyone who ever got to say a line in a commercial, has a first name that is the same as a mode of transport (for example, Boxcar, as in Boxcar Willie) or scored big for what we thought was fifteen minutes of undeserved fame with the cultural ditty of the year, now has a nightly show and a theater named after them in Branson Missouri. Even those that never had that Andy Warhol prerequisite nationally, are enjoying fame and fortune. Jennifer (apparently so famous that like Cher, Madonna, and Eljay, she doesn't need a last name to be recognized) is back for her fourth sensational season with her fantastic band, the Prime Time Pickers. Frederick, unbeknownst to the rest of the country, is America's Newest Piano Sensation (his credentials include a stint with Bob Hope). He plays two grand pianos simultaneously at "Waltzing Waters" the "liquid fireworks" show guaranteed by the brochures to be the most spectacular attraction of your trip. And remember folks, feel free to light up. Every section of the theater is a smoking section. (In fact, smoking is OK everywhere here -- gas stations, restaurants, hotels, so if you have emphysema or a compelling urge to express your non-smoker's rights, just hold your breath).

Our first glimpse of Americana's answer to the West End was on a steamy Sunday night. Wayne and Tony (referred to as "Oh, Tony O!" on the billboards, since we all know the "O") were off so we went to see that icon of the early seventies AM radio where his one hit medley could be regularly heard every week in the summer of '73, on Casey Kasem's top forty countdown. Yes, I am talking about none other than Jim "Spiders and Snakes" Stafford. Jim plays seven nights a week at the appropriately and imaginatively named Jim Stafford Theater.

For those of you who are wondering, the years have been kind to Jim. He must be pushing 55 now and has gained about thirty pounds, but still has those dimples. His southern accent is more pronounced now than it was during his brief illustrious musical career (so much so that some of the jokes are hard to understand, much like when you try to understand what the Rolling Stones are talking about during an interview in what is presumably English). But, like those British rock stars, you can always understand Jim when he sings.

During the show, the fully packed theater audience, ranging in age from two to the omnipresent bus of senior citizens, enthusiastically responds to Jim's questions and hoo and ha appreciatively at his jokes. Many of the jokes are 'set up' and helped along by a carefully placed usher 'stooge' masquerading as an innocent dumb, loud member of the general public. Mr. Stafford's style of humor carefully avoids being political in any way -- "How many people here have been called Democrats?" (scant scattered applause) "How many have been called Republicans?" (general thunderous ovation) "How many have been called Independents?" (my fiance clapped alone) -- is as partisan as Jim gets. He did tell three or four jokes that made it perfectly understood that homosexuality was not OK in this wholesome atmosphere -- not that there's anything wrong with that... -- but keep your kissin' to those of the opposite gender and presumably to those of non-opposite races.

The show was very clean, not even a four-letter suggestion was uttered, except for "The Legend of Cow Patty" (which us city folk call manure). My six-year-old son found it hilarious and my five-year-old daughter clapped in rhythm with Jim's catchy numbers. My fiance, who fancies himself a worldly sophisticate, chuckled throughout the performance. (I, of course, adored every moment of the show, having been a teenybopper in love with Jim during his fifteen minutes of fame and for years beyond). A Very Big Deal is of course made of his megahit "I-don't-like-spiders-and-snakes-but-that-ain't-what-it takes-to-love-me-like-I-want-to-be-loved-by-you". It is now a multimedia extravaganza, with fluorescent puppet accompaniment and an elaborate laser-light show. (You can also, after all these years, finally purchase a T-shirt or hat with the reptilian and arachnid likenesses that appear in the song.)

During intermission, Jim signs autographs and poses for pictures with his loyal fans. Two rotating dancing chickens make balloons for the small fry. We even got a Lettermanesque brush with fame when Jim Stafford's wife's poodle chased -- and almost bit -- our children Spike and Coco, in the lobby. (Spike tried unsuccessfully to fend off the offending dog with his sword balloon).

The crowd seemed happy, sober and satisfied as their special night out ended and they merged with the Anita Bryant patrons in the parking lot (from the appropriately and imaginatively-named Anita Bryant Theater next door, which shares Jim's parking lot). There is no loud rock music blaring outside, nor is anyone angry (or unduly happy), as the drivers and their families patiently sit in their domestic manufactured cars on Route 76 amidst the kids on bumper rafts and kids-of-all-ages on Go Karts, on their way to what will be their home for tonight. Perhaps this is a prozac-induced scene of the nineties, or maybe it was the placating influence of one of those many Sunday morning Christian services that are advertised on each block as open to all.

If you're not up to Disneyworld and want a wholesome good-ol'-boy-tie-a-yellow-ribbon-round-that-old-American-tree experience, pack your family up in the paneled camper or hop onto that senior citizen bus, and head on down to Southern Missouri. Leave the crime and racism of the urban jungle behind. Here they call a spade a shovel and a Hoe is not a disgusting Eddie Murphy punch line, but a garden tool, one that tills the soil of our country, these United States of America.

courtesy of www.webmerchants.com




Good wholesome clean fun in America's bible belt, Branson Missouri.
Come one, come all, unless of course your not white, hetrosexual, or Christian.

After reading about your experience, and this article, I would never visit Branson, unless I was on a crusade against hate issues, and had decided to put up a fight in the lions den. I certainly would not take my family there, and risk their safety, nor would I want them exposed to that type of behavior, even if they do promote a good clean atmosphere.

Id rather stay at home and huddle around the TV and watch Eddie Murphy movies, braving the occasional cuss word.

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Re: Black History
« Reply #405 on: September 08, 2008, 06:49 PM »
I depended on the advertisments by Branson and AAA when we made that choice. Plus we had a few friends that said they loved it. They are white which means they would not have been subjected to the same things, so their report to us was honest based on their experience.

But you are right T7L. A deeper research would have helped. I keep asking myself...who knew?? In todays time it never even occurred to me to research a tourism place for racism. Lesson learned.

One point though. I'm not throwing the whole police dept under the bus alone, I'm throwing all the powers that be under there with them. These boys did this so freely that it tells me they have been doing it with impunity all along. That tells me that all the powers that be doesn't care about it. I'll be willing to bet I'm not the first or only black person to be ignored with this complaint.

They can do something about this if they wanted to.
I'll give you an example. Pigeon Forge, Tn., Seiverville, Tn. and that area is known for KKK enclaves. I can remember going through there years ago and they let black folks know not to spend the night in those places. Fast forward to the building of Dollywood in that area and the economic growth as a result. I've been there several times since and I know a lot of black people that vacation in that area. I've never had a problem with racism since they've gone into this economic boom, nor have any of my black friends had a problem.

Does that mean the KKK and racism has disappeared? Not at all. What it does mean is the powers that be have made it known one can believe what they want in private, but they will not tolerate racist people racing up and down the main streets yelling racial slurs at a part of their economic base.
They have learned that they depend on green, not just white, to thrive.

Branson has not learned that black people bring green with them just like any other group.

Your point is well taken though.

Ohhh by the way, I did have sushi in Branson.
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.