Author Topic: Black History  (Read 460334 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2632 on: December 09, 2019, 02:37 AM »
What exactly is gaslighting?
How is it used?
Who are the majority of it's victims?
Is it new?
Can it be studied?
Is there a place where it is chronicled?
What are the results of a contextual years long study with sample groups, done by professional psychologists?

Want answers?
https://mental-health-matters.com/denying-racism-and-other-forms-of-gaslighting/
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2633 on: December 13, 2019, 08:23 AM »
This one was new to me.  I had never heard of "Gaslighting" and found the info very enlightening.  Check out the link for deeper discussion.

to gaslight -manipulate (someone) by psychological means into questioning their own sanity.
                  a tactic in which a person or entity, in order to gain more power, makes a victim question their reality.

11 Warning Signs of Gaslighting | Psychology Today
https://www.psychologytoday.com/.../201701/11-warning-signs-gaslighting

1. They tell blatant lies. …
2. They deny they ever said something, even though you have proof.
3. They use what is near and dear to you as ammunition.
4. They wear you down over time. This is one of the insidious things about gaslighting—
5. Their actions do not match their words.
6. They throw in positive reinforcement to confuse you.
7. They know confusion weakens people.
8. They project
9. They try to align people against you.
10. They tell you or others that you are crazy.
11. They tell you everyone else is a liar.


I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2634 on: December 13, 2019, 08:59 PM »
Good summary dear daughter.

That term got its start in the movie One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.
It was about a person locked into an asylum and one way they were convincing her she was crazy was to light and  unlight, or turn up and down the gas light.
It’s design was to make her think she wasn’t seeing what she was a seeing.

Lee Atwater picked up on that with the help of Jerry Falwell, newt Gingrich and Ronald Reagan.
That’s complicated, but those dots can be connected.
Today we see it all the time.
Trump supporters, most republicans, all of fox, Limbaugh, hannity, the info wars, teabaggers.
Those dots connect all of them.

I’ll give you a classic example.
When black people, who are intimately aware of what racism is, expose it or even talk about, we’re then accused of being the racists.
Read the definition of gaslighting and think about that.
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2635 on: December 14, 2019, 08:29 PM »
HISTORY IN THE MAKING:

Black Women Reign at Beauty Pageants

When Zozibini Tunzi was named Miss Universe on Sunday, it signified the first time ever  that black women had simultaneously held the top prize in four of the major beauty pageants.
Miss Universe, Miss America, Miss USA, and Miss Teen USA

They were:
Zozibini Tunzi-Miss Universe
Nia Franklin-Miss America
Chelsie Kryst-Miss USA
Kaleigh Garris-Miss Teen USA

https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/living/story/black-girl-magic-women-redefining-beauty-reigning-major-67703612


I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2636 on: December 16, 2019, 12:32 AM »
NEWS FLASH!!!!

MISS WORLD WAS JUST CROWNED AND SHE IS THE 5TH BLACK BEAUTY TO HOLD A MAJOR PAGEANT TITLE AT THE SAME TIME!

The crowning of Miss World 2019 has closed out this year’s historic pageant circuit, marking the first time the titles for all five top beauty contests were won by black women.
On Saturday, Jamaica’s Toni-Ann Singh was named Miss World, joining a 2019 cohort of advocates for prison reform, women’s rights and music education who used their platform to address conventional beauty standards: Miss Universe 2019 Zozibini Tunzi, Miss America Nia Franklin, Miss USA Cheslie Kryst and Miss Teen USA 2019 Kaliegh Garris.
“To that little girl in St. Thomas, Jamaica and all the girls around the world — please believe in yourself,” Singh wrote on Twitter. “Please know that you are worthy and capable of achieving your dreams. This crown is not mine but yours. You have a PURPOSE.”

Toni-Ann Singh-Miss World 2019
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2637 on: December 16, 2019, 08:42 PM »
Yeaaaa!!!
In the hood we say “black girls rock!”
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2639 on: December 30, 2019, 09:20 PM »
Credit:
Eva Haynes from her FB page.


Soooo you mean to tell me that someone down your ancestry line survived being chained to other human bodies for several months in the bottom of a disease-infested ship during the Middle Passage, lost their language, customs and traditions, picked up the English language as best they could while working free of charge from sun up to sun down as they watched babies sold from out of their arms and women raped by ruthless slave owners.

Took names with no last names, no birth certificates, no heritage of any kind, braved the Underground Railroad, survived the Civil War to enter into sharecropping... Learned to read and write out of sheer will and determination, faced the burning crosses of the KKK, everted their eyes at the black bodies swinging from ropes hung on trees...

 Fought in World Wars as soldiers only to return to America as boys, marched in Birmingham, hosed in Selma, jailed in Wilmington, assassinated in Memphis, segregated in the South, ghettoed in the North, ignored in history books, stereotyped in Hollywood...

and in spite of it all, someone in your family line endured every era to make sure you would get here, but you receive one rejection, face one obstacle, lose one friend, get overlooked, and you want to quit?

How dare you entertain the very thought of quitting. People, you will never know survived from generation to generation so you could succeed. Don’t you dare let them down!

It is NOT in our DNA to quit!
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2640 on: January 02, 2020, 01:48 AM »
We’ve talked about this further back. What little history there was is taught as a race war.
Those words are intentionally used to paint the optics of this as being something done by black peoples.
Well here’s a great tutorial about this event.

https://fbwat.ch/1xNXnGiTdB4cg4em
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2641 on: January 23, 2020, 01:03 AM »
This is why we need to do a personal vigorous study on Black History.
Even with my deep interest in the topic and continuing research, I missed this until today.

https://www.npr.org/sections/npr-history-dept/2015/12/01/455267676/a-forgotten-presidential-candidate-from-1904
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2643 on: February 08, 2020, 08:31 PM »
Credit:
WPS Equity and Inclusion

Dr. Sara Winifred Brown was born in 1868 in Winchester, VA.

Brown was a prominent African American teacher and doctor. She worked in disaster relief and gynecology. In 1910, she helped to found the group that would later become the National Association of University Women, and in 1924 was the first woman to serve as an alumni trustee of Howard University.

Brown attended Hampton University, then called Hampton Normal and Agriculture Institute, graduating with honors. She taught English in Washington, D.C., then took a leave of absence to attend Cornell University in 1894. At Cornell, she became interested in biology, graduating with a BS in biology in 1897. She returned to DC and taught biology. She then enrolled in Howard University, receiving her MD in 1904.

After receiving her MD from Howard, she entered medical practice. In 1908, Howard University hired her to lecture on gynecology, and she continued to practice medicine and teach high school biology. In 1910, she joined in the founding of the College Alumnae Club, which came to be called the National Association of College Women, and is now known as the National Association of University Women. During World War I, she was one of 50 women chosen by the Women's War Work Council to be part of the "Flying Squadron". In 1924, she was elected to the board of Howard University, the first woman to serve as an alumni trustee. In 1927, she joined a Red Cross relief effort to assist victims of severe flooding in Mississippi and Louisiana. In 1930, she joined a Gold Star Mothers pilgrimage to France.

The United States Department of Health and Human Services lists her as an African American Pioneer in Health Care. In the 1950s, her brother, Dr. John William Brown, donated $40,000 to Howard University, which renamed their Friendship Clinic to the Sara Winifred Brown Memorial Clinic. In 2010, as part of their Centennial celebration, the National Association of University Women planted a tree and placed a plaque to honor her founding efforts.
#BlackHistoryMonth2020
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2644 on: February 10, 2020, 12:51 AM »
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2645 on: February 11, 2020, 12:51 AM »
When white people tell us we should just get over it with regard to slavery, they are actually saying our history doesn’t matter.
We’re supposed to pretend none of that happened and none of that shaped what the country is today.
Of course they don’t avail themselves the knowledge of our history, in large part to intellectual laziness.
Studying our history takes effort and time.
When it happens, one has to do a lot of intellectual work to comprehend it.
Here’s what we’re supposed to just get over.

https://medium.com/the-aambc-journal/americas-breeding-farms-what-history-books-never-told-you-6704e8b152a4
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