Author Topic: Black History  (Read 452257 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2618 on: November 28, 2019, 07:15 PM »
It's interesting how many things were on paper, but the technology just didn't match the times, dear daughter.
Even more interesting how inventions from those days were credited to people who didn't invent them because they owned the people who did.
They were property, therefore what they did or accomplished became property. They had to intellectual rights and no rights to patents.
There's a story in these archives, that I won't search for right now, that involves a salve that actually invented the screw propeller f that advanced shipping from the paddle wheel to what is still used in modern vessels today.
Being a slave he had no rights how it was to be put to used. The salve master took that invention and put it to use in the confederacy. His invention was used to keep him a slave. 
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2619 on: November 28, 2019, 07:19 PM »
The civil war was and always has been about slavery...period.
Here's more verification.
Read the first paragraph from Abraham Lincoln in a last ditch effort to stop the first person to fire a shot at Fort Sumter, which we all know was the first shot to begin the civil war.

http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2063869,00.html
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2620 on: November 29, 2019, 06:46 PM »
John Brown's defense of his raid in his own words.

http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/johnbrown2.htm
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2621 on: December 03, 2019, 10:00 AM »
I agree that it's time to tell the truth.  That's what's going on in here.  It's often difficult to read about those things.  Speaking as a white person from the south, it's very difficult to have to actually read about the things that were done to slaves.  I have long wondered about my own emotions on the subject.  Yes, racism is still alive and well, but there are many others of us who are embarrassed and sorry.  Unfortunately we often have to pay for the sins of those slave owners and racist people by feeling mistrusted or left out.

I understand it, but that doesn't make it any easier to live with.  There are racist people in every ethnic group.  I don't get it, but it happens.  I just wish I didn't have the feeling that all white people are often lumped together.  I also sometimes feel I must "prove myself" to women of color.  Maybe the tables have turned.  I'm just sharing  my own perspective here.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2622 on: December 04, 2019, 08:28 PM »
Hon I feel you.
Let’s talk about racism. Racism is an institution put in place by white people who enforced that white supremacy.
Not a single other ethnic ground has the power to perpetrate, enforce, or even get away with racism or supremacy in this country.
There were no night riders, no enforcers of white slavery, no white crow laws, no discrimination or denial of civil rights or voting rights ever perpetrated on white society by people of color.
We don’t have the power nor have we ever had the power to be racists.

Now there is prejudice across all cultures. That comes in many different forms and it doesn’t come with the power systems that’s used for racism.
Sometimes we get the terms confused.

It is a problem when racism is discussed to make a distinction between individuals.
One cannot have this discussion and avoid the fact that nobody has this power but white peoples.
When this topic comes up in a general conversation, one cannot research all white people so as to exclude each individual from that discussion. It just can’t be done.

Having said that it has to be acknowledged that some of us are indiscriminate about how much we place the blame.
However more often than not black peoples acknowledge how valuable white people have been in the struggle for equality.
I’ve often wrote about it in these forums.
It has to be understood that black people over all don’t blame all white people for racism.
My advice on these discussions is if it doesn’t apply to you as an individual, don’t take it personally as an individual.
That’s my general answer.

My specific response to you dear daughter, is you don’t have to prove anything.
All you have to be is yourself. You can’t be responsible for how other people feel about you, black or white.
If people are looking for something negative, there’s nothing extra you can do about it.
By being your kind loving self, all they’ll  see  is a kind loving person without a racist bone in your body.
Being yourself is proving yourself.
Don’t ever think you have a responsibility to disprove a negative. You don’t.
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2623 on: December 04, 2019, 10:34 PM »
Wow that was powerful!   I learned something important. That racism can mean being passed over for a job due to skin color.  Then I see clearly now the difference in racism and prejudice.  The former makes me see how the people of color have been pushed back or denied what white people have.  Is it because white people are a majority in this country?   What would happen if that changes?  Is some of it the “birds of a feather” thing?  I think it could be mainly its because of how they were raised.  The plantation owners I guess had to put the slaves down to keep them working for free.  Surely some could see what it was--whites--and made an effort to stop it--i mean plantation owners etc.  The owners couldn’t have not seen it.  Maybe the almighty dollar won out over conscience and humanity.

I was blessed with godly parents.  They understood the scriptures and taught us that God loves ALL His children. 

I can feel kinder about myself for locking my car door when I see loiterers out at night, that happen to be black.  I do the same for white loiterers.   So I am “prejudiced” against loiterers.  lol

I’ve learned lots from you over the years Dad but this lesson was huge!  Thank you!
 :rose
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2624 on: December 06, 2019, 02:04 PM »
Thank you for that my dear.

I had a conversation the other day. I’ll post this as another general teaching moment.

Just to make a point.
It was recently asked why we bring up race so often. Of course those that ask that question don’t live our lives, so their default position is not seeing how engrained race is in just about everything.
I was chastised because I called out a racial slur I’ve heard many times in many conversations, blatantly and gaslighting.
The totality of my experience being black in America informed me it was a racist slur. So that was my default position.
Well a white person calls me out saying it meant something else and it shouldn’t have to be explained what it was.

See what’s going on here?

I’m being chastised by not using the white mans default position with the expectation that my experience being black in America should have automatically defaulted to white America thinking.
Why wasn’t the same consideration given to the fact that I shouldn’t have to explain what a racial slur is that I’ve heard all my life?
Why wasn’t it his responsibility to default to my way of thinking with my experience and I shouldn’t have to explain it to him?

Why do we bring color up all the time? Because even in the most mundane things the totality of our experience being black in America we see the racism.
Our experiences are not to be dismissed nor do we need to be lectured about not defaulting to what white America expects us to think.

Here’s an example. See if you can detect the problem.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/bride-angry-her-african-american-190300976.html?soc_src=yahooapp
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2625 on: December 07, 2019, 03:33 AM »
I had no idea about this culture or it’s influence on us down to this day


https://www.facebook.com/182135439049804/posts/495269354403076?d=n&sfns=mo
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2626 on: December 07, 2019, 05:55 AM »
You got me reading and googling "Haudenosaunee Confederacy" with that last post.  Wow very interesting and hopeful.  Go Women! LOL
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2627 on: Yesterday at 12:39 AM »
Speaking of strong women!!
Who?
What?
Where?
And especially pay attention to the time line with regard to that era and it's contextual history.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dido_Elizabeth_Belle
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2628 on: Yesterday at 12:54 AM »
What is a slur? What are pejoratives? Are they the same? How are they used? Does it make a difference who uses them and to whom they are directed? Can they be used and/or defined in ways that denies it's traditional meanings?

Is there a source that categories these questions, words, and terms in a way that's clear and educational?
Yes! This is the source. It is detailed and designed only for those who are serious about learning.

https://www.iep.utm.edu/pejorati/

Along those same lines, what are words and phrases we use in our modern day that are racist?
Some of this is repetitive from the previous site, but pay particular attention to the meaning Grandfather Clause

https://www.upworthy.com/10-common-phrases-that-are-actually-racist-af
 
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2629 on: Yesterday at 08:45 PM »
Elise, have you seen the movie Harriet yet?
Wanting to hear a critique from my dear daughter
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2630 on: Yesterday at 09:56 PM »
Unfortunately not!  It’s high on my growing list! Been down with a bad cold.  I reallyyyyy wanna see it!
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2631 on: Yesterday at 10:20 PM »
awwww, I sure hope you're able to shake that off shortly
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