Author Topic: Black History  (Read 452260 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2604 on: November 01, 2019, 01:42 AM »
here's a good site to research African American history through centuries of time lines.

https://www.blackpast.org/african-american-history-american-west/
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2605 on: November 01, 2019, 01:58 AM »
I've been reviewing some of the older posts here and I'm finding a lot of the links are no longer operational.
They've been up, some of them, for several years and the pages are no longer available.
Though this is beyond my control, I'm still compelled to apologize for the lack of linked sources to verify the content.
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2606 on: November 01, 2019, 03:33 AM »
Dad, I hope you will see the new Harriet Tubman movie and tell us what you think!
 :dblu
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2607 on: November 01, 2019, 08:21 PM »
That’s definitely on my to do list.
I’ve done a lot of studying about her and I hope they stick close to that reality and not fictionalize her.
Of course we know there will be fillers because there are gaps we just can’t know about
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2608 on: November 10, 2019, 10:19 PM »
The GI bill was created to help veterans coming home from ww2 to achieve opportunities in life.
America, Roosevelt, all the patriots cheered and supported the veterans who sacrificed so much during the war. Right?

Right?


http://va.topbuzz.com/s/UhFkQr
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2609 on: November 11, 2019, 06:44 AM »
Wow I would never hsve known this about the GI Bill.  I sincerely hope that has changed.  I hope nobody is able to wield that kind of power these days.  But it seems to me that equal opportunity regarding education from grade one would help, to level the playing field.   Race shouldn't affect educational opportunity.   I'm hoping the world is getting better.  Sometimes it's easy to feel helpless when people all over the world are warring for racial reasons.   Thanks for sharing!
  :rose
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2610 on: November 13, 2019, 02:51 PM »
I saw the movie Harriet on Tuesday.
It was enjoyable, had some little known facts about her life highlighted.
I know there are many gaps in the history of her life due to the secrecy of her work with the Underground Railroad and there in is the problem I had with the movie.
Being a serious study of Harriet Tubman, the fillers Hollywood put in seemed to be more strained fiction than making the story fit her skills, awareness and leadership.

For example. In her early years she was hit in the head with a steel weight while interfering in an action between a slave driver and another slave, that was mentioned. She suffered from that the rest of her life. She did have spells where she passed out.
She did have faith. But not one instance have I read she passed out during any escape event and was given a vision. It’s not mentioned in any biography or study in her life.
It’s a personal opinion, but that bit of fictionalization took the movie down a peg for me.
I know there’s no way to actually say how she led with such success, but they needed to make it more personal to her skills.
The times she left Philadelphia and suddenly returned with freed slaves was too bland for me.

There were aspects of her life that could have been added to balance that blandness. Like her being a spy or a nurse during the civil war.
Her work on behave of woman’s suffrage.

I was particularly irritated at one of the closing lines about Harriet Tubman being one of few women to lead combat missions.
That cheapened  her role to the point of being more than a slight. To me it was an insult.
Sec of War Stanton recruited her personally because of her knowledge of South Carolina.
She planned the mission and led it second in command of the mission.
And she was the FIRST American woman to lead a USA military mission. Not just one of many.
They need to give her her due.
John Glenn isn’t recorded as being one of many who landed on the moon.
He’s given his due as being the first to land on the moon.

There were some high spots and I recommend the movie as generally ok.
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Offline daisyxo

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2611 on: November 15, 2019, 10:40 PM »
It's always interesting to find out how much "fluff and embellishment" that the film industry adds to reality.
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2612 on: November 16, 2019, 01:43 AM »

« Reply #1235 on: July 10, 2011, 03:20 PM »

A few posts back I put up some educational links about a spy network working for the Union known as The Black Dispatches. I noticed those links are no longer working. so as not to loose the information I'm going to do a series on these who these people were, what they did and how they did it.
The South's inability to grant the slave a human status with regard to intelligence and a desire to be free proved to be a major mistake.
Robert E. Lee said it best...
"The chief source of information to the enemy," Gen. Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate Army, said in May 1863, "is through our negroes."

These unsung Civil War heroes were often successful, to the chagrin of Confederate leaders who never thought their disregard for blacks living among them would become a major tactical weakness.


Harriet Tubman

Quote
When it comes to the Civil War and the fight to end slavery, Harriet Tubman is an icon. She was not only a conductor of the Underground Railroad, but also a spy for the Union.

In 1860, she took her last trip on the Underground Railroad, bringing friends and family to freedom safely. After the trip, Tubman decided to contribute to the war effort by caring for and feeding the many slaves who had the fled the Union-controlled areas.

 
A year later, the Union Army asked Tubman to gather a network of spies among the black men in the area. Tubman also was tasked with leading expeditions to gather intelligence. She reported her information to a Union officer commanding the Second South Carolina Volunteers, a black unit involved in guerrilla warfare activities.

After learning of Tubman's capability as a spy, Gen. David Hunter, commander of all Union forces in the area, requested that Tubman personally guide a raiding party up the Combahee River in South Carolina. Tubman was well prepared for the raid because she had key information about Confederate positions along the shore and had discovered where they placed torpedoes (barrels filled with gunpowder) in the water. On the morning of June 1, 1863, Tubman led Col. James Montgomery and his men in the attack. The expedition hit hard. They set fires and destroyed buildings so they couldn't be used by the Confederate forces. The raiders freed 750 slaves. (More about this at the bottom of this post)

The raid along the Combahee River, in addition to her activities with the Underground Railroad, made a significant contribution to the Union cause. When Tubman died in 1913, she was honored with a full military funeral in recognition for work during the war.

NOTE:
Harriet Tubman was a strong and much sought after escaped slave and abolitionist. During one of her speeches a man yelled out, "Old woman!!! I don't think no more of you than I do a flea!!!" Harriet Tubman responded, "I may be just a flea, but at least I'll keep you scratchin'"

And that she most certainly did!  Moving from a slave, to nursing Union solders, to running the Underground Railroad, to being the first woman in American history to be asked to plan and lead a military action against the enemy, to having full military honors at her funeral.

A little trivia about Harriet Tubman's raid up the Cumbahee river.
During this mission she was second in command to Col. James Montgomery himself.
Contemplate that for a moment. An uneducated black female ex slave being second in command to a Colonel.

Here is what a Confederate report said of the raid:

The enemy, said a Confederate report on the raid, seems to have been well posted as to the character and capacity of our troops ... and to have been well guided by persons thoroughly acquainted with the river and country. Unwittingly, the report was praising the work of slaves working for Tubman.

Conformation that Harriet Tubman was the first woman in american history to devise and lead a successful military mission:

Reporting on the raid to Secretary of War Stanton, Brigadier General Rufus Saxton said, This is the only military command in American history wherein a woman, black or white, led the raid, and under whose inspiration. it was originated and conducted.

Tubmans spies added to the heroic chronicles of the Black Dispatches.
She was a huge flea.
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2613 on: November 18, 2019, 05:00 AM »
Hey Dad, thanks for refreshing those links!  I like to pop in and follow links to read things I missed and this will surely help!  I hope to see the Harriet Tubman movie soon.  Whether the directors/producers took liberties or not, it's time she is honored and her story is told.
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2614 on: November 20, 2019, 11:11 PM »
When you do, make sure you come back and give us your review
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2615 on: November 23, 2019, 06:11 AM »
Correction!
When you do, my dear daughter, make sure you give us your review.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2616 on: November 25, 2019, 03:40 AM »
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2617 on: November 25, 2019, 04:13 PM »
Very interesting  article Dad!  It’s hard to imagine such innovation back then! 
 : :kool
I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson