Author Topic: Black History  (Read 435874 times)

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2576 on: February 03, 2019, 08:03 PM »
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2579 on: February 09, 2019, 08:39 PM »
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2580 on: February 11, 2019, 12:14 PM »
To most of us, the phrase “Uncle Tom” is synonymous with a Black person who has sold out their race. The character Stephen from Django played by Samuel L. Jackson, is a perfect example of someone commonly referred to as a “Tom.”

In actuality, the term “Sambo” better fits the characteristics we often ascribe to Uncle Tom.

The racial term “Sambo” first came to prominence in modern American culture with the publishing of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. However, the origin of the term reaches back to the 1700s according to some scholars, and there is evidence the name is a variation of a West African name as well.

Today, the term is largely derogatory but the etymology of the word appears to be “zambo,” a word that was used during the Spanish and Portuguese Empire periods to describe a mixed person that appeared more Black than white. It was also said to mean bow-legged or knock-kneed. There is also evidence that the word is derived from the West African Foulah tribal language, which translates into “uncle.”

In Stowe’s 1852 book, the character of Sambo was one of the slave overseers that work for the cruel slave owner, Simon Legree. Uncle Tom, a god-fearing slave with a compassionate heart, was tormented and beaten to death by Sambo, who regretted his act even as Tom forgave him as he was dying. Although Stowe had higher aims with her book, the depiction of Black characters as matronly and subservient further added to stereotypes that persist today

Scottish author Helen Bannerman’s The Story of Little Black Sambo in 1899 also gave the term more of its negative connection. The tale of a dark-skinned East Indian boy helped push the narrative that the term was racist and meant to be offensive.

Other variants of the name appear throughout African and indigenous culture across the Caribbean. In several African languages, especially along the coasts, the name was rather common despite differing spellings.

https://blackamericaweb.com/2017/01/11/little-known-black-history-fact-sambo/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2581 on: February 13, 2019, 07:35 PM »
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2582 on: February 15, 2019, 10:37 PM »
Do you know just how horrific racism is even as late as tge 1959’s?
This is what we’re supposed to just get over.

https://blackmainstreet.net/never-forget-69-black-boys-were-padlocked-into-a-dormitory-where-a-mysterious-fired-started-21-burned-to-death/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2583 on: February 17, 2019, 11:44 AM »
“We broke a few eggs so we could continue this project...”

https://www.facebook.com/1482981722/posts/10218372217485113?sfns=mo
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2584 on: February 20, 2019, 06:03 PM »
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2586 on: February 21, 2019, 10:02 AM »
In 1860 the mid Atlantic slave trade was already illegal.
But as is the wont of those who believe in white supremacy, the law was ignored.
Not only ignored, but slavers bragged about doing it.
Here is the story of the last officially documented slave ship in 1860.
I seriously doubt it literally was the last slave shipment, but that’s another story

https://www.history.com/news/slaves-clotilda-ship-built-africatown
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2587 on: February 23, 2019, 06:38 AM »
During slavery, did a free state equate to freedom for freed slaves?

https://www.history.com/news/california-once-tried-to-ban-black-people
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2588 on: February 26, 2019, 08:58 AM »
Here’s another thing black people are supposed to just get over.
Notice the dates.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/vintageafricanamericanphotography/permalink/2162503977136642?sfns=mo
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2589 on: February 28, 2019, 02:45 PM »
Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche, an African born in Cap Haitien, Haiti May 26 1886. Not much is known about Joseph's young life, except he was a excellent student. At the age of 15 he decided he wanted to be an engineer. Haiti had no such schools so Joseph was sent to Beauvais, France in the company of a teacher the Lord Bishop of Haiti, Monseigneur Kersuzan. Joseph was allowed entry into to high school, excelled, and became a serious promising student in the engineering school.

Life went on and March 1908 Joseph married Juliette Lafargues, the only daughter of a white upper class wine seller. They set off on their journey through life with the expectation of finding good employment as there was many opportunities for a young man with his education and abilities, but the ugliness of racism was alive and well in France. He did find work, but was paid poorly, the excuse ranging from being too young or inexperienced. ( sound familiar?)

They made do for a time and a year later on Feb 19, 1909 a daughter, Simonne, was born. Another year passed and a second daughter was born prematurely July 2, 1910. She was named Louise and she had many health problems. Joseph and Juliette were dedicated to their children and could no longer except or live on the substandard wages he was being paid, because of the medical bills for Louise. By 1911 they decided to move back to Haiti for better employment. By that time Haiti was a growing nation and the opportunities for qualified engineers held much promise. The matter was discussed and the move was planned for 1913.

As fortune would have it Juliette discovered she was pregnant in March 1912. The trip was moved up to make it more comfortable on Juliette and Joseph's mother in Haiti bought the tickets as a welcome home present. The trip was booked for April 20 from Le Harve to New York and then to Haiti, but there was a complication. The ship had a policy that required children to stay in the nursery, even at meal times. Juliette and Joseph would have none of that, so they transferred to another ship and left tens days earlier on April 10, 1912. They would sail to Cherbourg, then to New York and then to Haiti and the beginning of their new life.

They were booked on second class passage, which was unsatisfactory to Juliette coming from an upper class family and being used to first class accommodations, but they made do.
Sailing day was sunny and pleasant. The accounts of their time on board becomes a little muddled at this point. Some accounts have them as quite sociable and excepted on the ship, other accounts say they were shunned because of Joseph's race.
I believe both could be true, as we see that even to this day, but it wouldn't matter in time. Just four days into the trip on April 14 the ship met with disaster. 
As Joseph put his pregnant wife and two daughters on the life boats he kissed them and said, I'll see you in New York.
They never saw each other again. Joseph, at the age of 26, died at sea.

Joseph Philippe Lemercier Laroche, the only black passenger, died  during the sinking of the Titanic.
In fact he was the only black person to die aboard the Titantic. There were no black workers on board. They were mostly Irish.

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