Author Topic: Black History  (Read 447337 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2422 on: December 14, 2016, 01:00 AM »
Who was Benjamin Montgomery? What lesson does he teach in how education is important? What lesson does he teach about no matter how many privileges you're allowed to have as a slave, does it mean you're anything more than a slave?
Read about his life and how he faired. read about his son.
When you're finished consider a point of irony that was left out of this story.
The invention he was responsible for, was put to use by those that allowed him the privilege to have that education to keep him a slave.

http://blackinventor.com/benjamin-montgomery/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2423 on: December 14, 2016, 01:06 AM »
You think you can come up with a couple of things so incompatible with each other it would be impossible to make a connection between them?
Here's the next question for your trivia game. What is the connection between butter and dead people?
No, really. There really is a connection. Honest.

http://blackinventor.com/albert-richardson/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2424 on: December 14, 2016, 01:16 AM »
One more? You talked me into it.
We discussed early on the origin of the saying 'the real McCoy.' It was to make sure people got the real actual device invented by an former slave name Elijah McCoy. He invented an automated lubrication device for railroad cars and revolutionized industry from that point forward.

Now meet Andrew Beard. His invention further revolutionized the railroad industry, saving many limbs and lives. His invention is used in modern forms to this day.
Seems the railroad industry owes a lot to black inventors.

http://blackinventor.com/andrew-beard/
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2425 on: December 14, 2016, 01:30 AM »
Oops. I just ran up on this and I have to share.
One invention opened up space exploration in ways unknown before, the ability to measure pollution, the ability to see stars thousands of miles away, the ability to see images in space by using gases in heretofore unknown ways, used on the 1957 Apollo mission as a singular device of it's kind and a second version used on the 1974 Sky Lab space flight to study comets.
It would also be used to observe Halley’s, West’s and Kohoutek’s comets.

And that's just the tip of the iceberg from this black inventor with not a single mention of him in the history books.
Ohh you want to know who he is. Sorry. I was about to go on a rant.

http://blackinventor.com/george-carruthers/
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2426 on: December 15, 2016, 12:54 AM »
I hope this picture comes through. Nothing to do with history, but if this don't make you smile you got a heart of stone.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2427 on: December 15, 2016, 08:54 PM »
Many tools are used in the racial propaganda machine. Let's reflect on wartime and the sacrifice our troops make in life and blood.
Did you know that African Americans both free and slave fought in every war this country was involved in?
Interesting how neither freeman or slave promised freedom for his services, was never fully given what was promised back in the developing and uniting of this country. The narrative seems to always turn to just get over it when that history is discussed.
Well is it just ancient history when discussing the racial tools and protocols used to slight the African Americans during times of war?

Check this out. Pay attention to the time line and propaganda tools used.
Windows media player recommend.

http://jfredmacdonald.com/stereotyping.htm
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2428 on: December 15, 2016, 08:58 PM »
What are coded spirituals? What place do they have in American history? Why are they left out of mainstream history?
Would you like not only the answers but audio links to hear them?
Well now, this is your
 day to do so.

http://www.pbs.org/video/2181639247/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2429 on: December 15, 2016, 09:29 PM »
Just a few short days from being 2017 and we still have this near the 5th richest city in the nation.
http://www.theroot.com/articles/culture/2016/12/sandbranch-texas-water-crisis/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2431 on: December 18, 2016, 03:13 AM »
We are all too familiar of the atrocities committed by Germany, the Nazis, the holocaust, and that entire machine during WWII.
The diary of Anne Frank is one of the most well read real time documentation of how horrible it was.

I chanced upon this article about Anne Frank and though to post it for three reasons.

1) It offers another more detailed theory as to rather or not Anne Frank's family was betrayed
2) The comment section is an education on how people can look right at facts and use hatred, bigotry and outright ignorance to deny this facts.
It so parallels the same kind of attitude that people use to deny science, deny CIA and FBI intell into Russian interference in our elections.
Bigotry and ignorance seems to be huge requirements in the field of denials.
3) This is the biggest reason to look at this link. There is a very short video showing the only know capture of Anne Frank on film.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2016/12/17/was-anne-franks-family-betrayed-after-72-years-historians-have-a-new-theory/?tid=pm_world_pop&utm_term=.6fc7e65e6a15#comments
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2432 on: December 18, 2016, 04:06 AM »
Here's a lesson on white privilege. Not the usual norm of that privilege thinking it's owner has the right to put forth demands and not even think of the consequences, but expect black folks to comply just because he says so.
Not the usual fare of denial that it has anything to do with race when that white privilege is called out.
Not even a lesson on the smugness it takes to force your white privilege on lack people.

Rather it's a lesson on how a dignified response was made to this offense by a well qualified intelligent back man, but somehow all the white privileged folks only sees the black man who was insulted as the aggressor and run to the defense of thier white privilege in spite of how this black man explained why it was offensive.

Be sure to read the last sentence of the article. Do you see it? The very height of white privilege informs that person that he's being gracious and apologetic by telling the one HE offended the black person knows where HE lives and he can come to HIS house to talk about it.
Well just how benevolent is that? You use your white privilege to insult and offend, and your white privilege demands that in the process of working this out you don't go to the one you offended, ohhhh nooo. Your white privilege demands the black person come to you for the apology.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2016/10/10/mind-your-manners-a-white-man-wrote-to-his-black-neighbor-this-was-the-response-2/?tid=hybrid_experimentrandom_1_na&utm_term=.0470bb27a1ff
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2433 on: January 02, 2017, 01:34 AM »
We did an extensive write on the life of Josephine Baker many pages back. I just found information that is new to me. I don't know how I missed this very important part of her life.

http://spymuseum.com/josephine-baker/
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Offline Mystic1

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Re: Black History
« Reply #2434 on: January 11, 2017, 02:24 PM »
To most of us, the phrase “Uncle Tom” is synonymous with a Black person who has sold out their race. The character Stephen from Django played by Samuel L. Jackson, is a perfect example of someone commonly referred to as a “Tom.”

In actuality, the term “Sambo” better fits the characteristics we often ascribe to Uncle Tom.

The racial term “Sambo” first came to prominence in modern American culture with the publishing of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s anti-slavery book, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. However, the origin of the term reaches back to the 1700s according to some scholars, and there is evidence the name is a variation of a West African name as well.

Today, the term is largely derogatory but the etymology of the word appears to be “zambo,” a word that was used during the Spanish and Portuguese Empire periods to describe a mixed person that appeared more Black than white. It was also said to mean bow-legged or knock-kneed. There is also evidence that the word is derived from the West African Foulah tribal language, which translates into “uncle.”

In Stowe’s 1852 book, the character of Sambo was one of the slave overseers that work for the cruel slave owner, Simon Legree. Uncle Tom, a god-fearing slave with a compassionate heart, was tormented and beaten to death by Sambo, who regretted his act even as Tom forgave him as he was dying. Although Stowe had higher aims with her book, the depiction of Black characters as matronly and subservient further added to stereotypes that persist today

Scottish author Helen Bannerman’s The Story of Little Black Sambo in 1899 also gave the term more of its negative connection. The tale of a dark-skinned East Indian boy helped push the narrative that the term was racist and meant to be offensive.

Other variants of the name appear throughout African and indigenous culture across the Caribbean. In several African languages, especially along the coasts, the name was rather common despite differing spellings.

https://blackamericaweb.com/2017/01/11/little-known-black-history-fact-sambo/
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Re: Black History
« Reply #2435 on: January 14, 2017, 01:21 AM »
Excellent write G. Excellent.
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