Author Topic: Black History  (Read 442294 times)

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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1694 on: July 04, 2013, 08:15 PM »
I have learned MANY MANY things in this Black History section of the boards, and remembering back about when this was first posted and discussed, I think it is the most fascinating thing ever.   How the slaves cleverly made songs that passed for gospel songs to the owners, but in reality were directions for the slaves to escape and find safe houses.  What an amazing thing.   I remember hearing some of their songs.   This has touched me so much.  We often take our freedom for granted, but they cherished freedom above all.  Their ingenuity is amazing.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1695 on: July 04, 2013, 08:18 PM »
I love seeing our young people being taught their own history. Just think of the lessons in courage these young ladies are learning from their ancestors.

Thank you too for stopping by elise.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1696 on: July 05, 2013, 09:18 PM »
Opened question for any and all readers of this forum.

Whatever you're doing, would you claim a 90% failure rate is acceptable?

Any job, in school, a marriage, running a race, making love, buying a car, writing reports; I don't care what it is. Is a 90% failure rate a reason to keep doing the same thing?

A simple yes or no. I'd like to see what you think.
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1697 on: July 05, 2013, 10:49 PM »
Well, not to me.  I have heard that the definition of "insanity" is doing the same thing over and over and getting the same results.   Would need to change direction to get that percentage in your favor.
 :tongue 
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1698 on: July 05, 2013, 11:13 PM »
Thanks, my dear daughter, for your reply. I'm going to wait to see what other answers I get before I say why I asked the question.

A note the readers of this forum. During the transition from splash hall to tin roof alley, some of the posts in this forum were lost and others gained symbols, signs and numbers in the words that rendered some posts impossible to read. Other post were missing parts and some had disappeared all together.

Well I have some good news. I've just spent quite some time going through one post and one page at a time to correct those problems. I also was able to retrieve most of the missing parts of posts as well as retrieve missing posts.  I would like to invite the new readers to go back and take a look around to see what you missed.  An example of some posts that were missing, but are now available: 

Extensive discussion on the Disney movie 'SONG OF THE SOUTH'
Christmas for the slave
The historical story behind Billie Holiday and her song 'STRANGE FRUIT'

and other stories of interest.
I've also taken the time to streamline the forum which may not be outwardly evident, but shortens the time it will take to catch up.  I hope this will be helpful and enjoyable.
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Offline Halo

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1699 on: July 06, 2013, 09:28 AM »
Well, not to me.  I have heard that the definition of "insanity" is doing the same thing over and over and getting the same results.   Would need to change direction to get that percentage in your favor.
 :tongue 

Opened question for any and all readers of this forum.

Whatever you're doing, would you claim a 90% failure rate is acceptable?

Any job, in school, a marriage, running a race, making love, buying a car, writing reports; I don't care what it is. Is a 90% failure rate a reason to keep doing the same thing?

A simple yes or no. I'd like to see what you think.

No!
Be careful of your thoughts; they may become words at any moment.  ~  Ira Gassen

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1700 on: July 06, 2013, 05:44 PM »
Thanks Halo. Including me, that's 3 in the no column.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1701 on: July 08, 2013, 03:40 PM »
It doesn't look like I'm going to get anyone to agree a 90% failure rate is a good measure of things. I'm quite sure the same folks wouldn't agree to 88% failure rate as being good either.

So lets change the equation by paying attention to a study given you by your own people showing you how to increase your results by 30 to 60 percent. What would you do then?

I know the answer should be obvious, or should it?  Yes or no.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1702 on: July 09, 2013, 03:52 PM »
NOTE*
Last year a black singer took a lot of heat for saying July 4th is a white holiday. Fox and other right wing venues went apoplectic over the statement. I can't remember the singer's name, but, though he was less than artful in the way he said it, he was historically correct in what he said. Of course the institutional racism that Fox and most of the other right wing mediums gleefully participate in, kept them stuck on stupid. Why do I say that? Remember what institutionalized racism is? It's the cultural conditioning of America to under value, underestimate, and marginalize black people.

That explains why they are stuck on stupid.  That cultural conditioning makes them so intellectually lazy, they would rather automatically devalue that black singer's statement, rather than educate themselves as to the truth of what he was saying.

Well we won't let that pass one more day. What is the truth about what was said? Why is it historically correct, in historical context, to say July 4th is a white holiday?


Who is more qualified to explain this us than the great orator himself Frederick Douglas ?
 

July 5th 1852. A quiet day as far as main stream history is concerned, but this day held far more significance in slave history and the history of abolition.

July 4th was seen as an insult by the slaves and free blacks, as well as the abolitionsts. Blacks, free and slave alike, fought and died for the freedoms enjoyed and celebrated on July 4th, only to be denied the same rights and freedoms.
The promise of freedom was hollow, not even the hand picked "Black Bucks" who fought in Yorktown and helped defeat Cornwallis thereby giving birth to this nation, won any of the freedoms celebrated on July 4th.

July 4th was celebrated in quite a different way in the 19th century. It was very sacred, almost a religious service, so it is quite significant that the free blacks, slaves and abolitionsts didn't celebrate July 4th.
As a way of protest to the falsehoods and empty promises of July 4th, they would just ignore it, not even speaking of it until July 5th.

Research brings a few interesting stories about this little known way of protesting.
One such story brings us to one who is touted as the greatest orator for abolition in the 19th century, Frederick Douglas.
He lived half his life as a slave. At great risk he ran away and after a long and historic struggle finally won his freedom.
 
Fast forward to July 4th 1852, Rochester, NY. Frederick Douglas was asked to give a speech in recgonition of July 4th at Corinthian Hall. He struggled greatly over that request in light of the afore mention reasons, but not one to miss an opportunity to speak about freedom, he prepared to do so.
As it happened July 4th was on a Sunday that year and the city officials of Rochester moved the celebration to Monday July 5th.
Frederick Douglas did not waste the gift of this day, or the significance. He knew he was going to be speaking to the whole of America that day.

He had to capture the audience or risk loosing them from the start.
He stepped up to the podium, he had a habit of standing silent for a few moments before speaking, then he started to speak with the baritone voice of a master orator:

"Fellow citizens, pardon me, allow me to ask, why am I called upon to speak here today? What have I, or those I represent, to do with your national independence? Are the great principles of political freedom and of natural justice, embodied in that Declaration of Independence, extended to us? and am I, therefore, called upon to bring our humble offering to the national altar, and to confess the benefits and express devout gratitude for the blessings resulting from your independence to us? "...

The title of his speech was 'What To the American Slave is Your July 4th?'
Ohh what a speech it was. It has been called the greatest abolition speech of the 19th century.

The speech by Frederick Douglas:
 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/aia/part4/4h2927t.html

 The Speech plus a bio of Frederick Douglas:
http://www.freemaninstitute.com/douglass.htm
 
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1703 on: July 09, 2013, 04:56 PM »
There was a huge outcry against those that called Paula Deen to task due to recent events. Seems there were all kinds of comments defending her with a willingness to overlook racist behavior, while black people in particular were castigated for saying she was wrong and her language was offensive.

Now here's what I find curious. There's a news story about the FBI arresting a man who tried to extort Paula Deen threatening to expose her behavior. I've been following the story to see what would be said about it in the comment sections on the same web services as the first Paula Deen story.
Next to nothing is being said about an obvious extortionist, a criminal. The same web pages that were loaded with folks ridiculing black people because they were offended by speech  that is designed to do just that, be offensive, is surprisingly silent about a person who deliberately was trying to do harm.

What's wrong with this picture?  Can you say 'cultural conditioning'?
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1704 on: July 11, 2013, 06:09 PM »


In 1955 a young black woman refused to surrender her seat in Montgomery, Al. to a white man.
She refused to get off the bus as ordered, was arrested and the rest is history. We know the story well. Or do we?

Well hold on to your hats folks.
I'm not talking about Rosa Parks and what she did in 1955. This one blew me away and it should be right up there with Rosa Parks.

Allow me to introduce Claudette Colvin born Sept, 5 1939 in Montgomery, Al., and she still survives today in New York.

March 2 1955 Claudette was riding a city bus on the way home from school in Montgomery. Upon making a pick up on Court St., a handful of white passengers got on and the bus driver saw there weren't enough seats for them all to sit.
He ordered the forward four black people to move, even though they were in the blacks only seats. Claudette and one other did not move. The bus driver stopped, walked back and ordered them to move. At that time the other girl moved, Claudette just looked out the window.
An extremely brave thing for a 15 year old black girl to do in the deep south.
 
Her reason?
"I'd moved for white people before," Colvin says. "But this time, I was thinking of the slavery fighters I had read about recently during Negro History Week in February. The spirit of Harriet Tubman and Sojourner Truth was in me. I didn't get up."

The bus driver summoned the police. One of them kicked her, another knocked her books from her hands and she was dragged off the bus handcuffed, kicking and screaming about her constitutional rights being violated because she had paid just like the white folks to ride. Claudette was arrested, charged with resisting, assault and battery on police officers, violating segregation laws, disorderly conduct, and was thrown into an adult cell. Some reports say she cursed the police and others as she was dragged off the bus. In a 2005 interview Claudette says she was the one cursed and ridiculed by the police.

http://core-europe.org/History/colvin.htm

Now jailed, Claudette's case was discussed among the black leaders and NAACP as the test case they were looking for to carry to court. All the way to the Supreme Court if necessary.
They solicited the services of a white lawyer, Clifford Durr, who took his life in his hands and suffered greatly on behalf of the civil rights movement.

http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/bio_durr.htm

Some controversy developed on the subject of using Claudette Colvin as the test case. She was 15, which brought into question her maturity to go through the ordeal. She became pregnant by a married man, which made her a hard sell for the religiously conservative back churches. Others say she was too dark. Fair skinned blacks were more favorably viewed even in the black community. Plus Claudette was given to emotional outburst, as any 15 year old would be.
But understanding the times, any thing that would be viewed as a distraction in this test case would have to be considered and rejected.

More on Claudette Colvin:
http://www.drizzle.com/~jcouture/1_government/gov_civil_rights/L%20Claud%20Colvin.htm

The civil rights movement needed some one that had the maturity to go through an arduous trial and they needed someone of unimpeachable character. They found that person in Rosa Parks, fair skin and all.

Just as an aside. Rosa Parks' action was not staged, as some would have you believe. She did what she did for the reasons she clearly stated all through her life. She came to the attention of the NAACP after her arrest. She met all the criteria the leadership was looking for. They went to her and her husband, laid out the plan for the test case, and Rosa Park's husband said "go for it."

BUT WAIT!!! there's another twist to this story.
Are you familiar with Aurelia Browder, Susie McDonald, Mary Louise Smith in association withClaudette Colvin?
Not many people are.

Here's the rest of the story.

All these women predated Rosa Parks in being thrown off buses in Montgomery, Al., charged with violating segregation laws, arrested, jailed and fined. The time of these events spans from 9 months to just 40 days before Rosa Parks. It just happens that Rosa Parks met the criteria to be that public face for the NAACP when she sparked the bus boycott. Rosa Park's galvanized the black community, after all the trial runs by the previously mention women.

Here's a trivia question for you. Was it Rosa Parks' arrest leading to the Montgomery bus boycott that went to the Supreme Court and put a stop to bus segregation?

SURPRISE FOLKS!!!. The answer is no. In fact Rosa Parks' arrest had nothing to do with the end of bus segregation, except being the public face of the movement.

Guess who should be credited with the victory?

Well it was the case of BROWDER v. GAYLE that overturned bus segregation in Montgomery.
Aurelia Browder was the lead plaintiff against Montgomery's mayor Gayle, the city of Montgomery, Al., and the bus company.
Joining her as plaintiffs were Susie McDonald, Claudette Colvin and Mary Louise Smith Those 4 went all the way to the Supreme Court and won.

Neither Rosa Parks nor Dr. King were plaintiffs in the case.

When their court victory reached the ears of the black community in Montgomery, the bus boycott ended the next day.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Browder_v._Gayle
http://www.tolerance.org/teach/activities/activity.jsp?cid=388

All of these women had nothing but praise for Rosa Parks, but they were disappointed that their contribution went essentially unnoticed. Some bios on these unsung, but extraordinary women:

Mary Louise Smith:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Louise_Smith
http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/bio_mlsmith.htm

Claudette Colvin:
http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/profile_colvin.htm

Aurelia Browder:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aurelia_Browder
http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/profile_browder.htm

Unfortunately I couldn't find any bio for Susie McDonald.

***PLEASE NOTE
I just noticed those pages I linked to about these four brave women are no longer up. This is re-posted from a few years ago and I have no idea why the pages were taken down.
However below I have a link to the page that has information from and about these women and others.  I invite you to take a look and read the links therein.

http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/voices-of-the-boycott/

http://www.montgomeryboycott.com/claudette-colvin/
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1705 on: July 12, 2013, 10:57 AM »
Fascinating stuff!  Courageous women...every one!!!
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1706 on: July 12, 2013, 03:59 PM »
They sure were hon.

FYI, I haven't forgotten my open question. I haven't had time to pull it all together in one sitting, but I'll get to it.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #1707 on: July 14, 2013, 02:06 PM »
I'm ex-law enforcement so I support our judicial system. That in no way means I support the racial disparity and low value put on black lives in this country. When a teenage black boy can't walk home in safety, that's one thing. When a teenage black boy can't walk home without being followed, shot, and killed, that's such a horrendous travesty it's mind boggling.
I challenge anyone to put your teenager in the shoes of Travon Martin and tell me you would support a black man being armed and following your child.

So now since it's been codified into law and court precedent that it's perfectly alright to profile, follow, and murder black teenagers, what is the black community to do? I'll tell you what I'm going to do and what I'm recommending to the black community.

We have a right not to be murdered simply because some fool thinks we haven't a right to be some place. I lived through this before, where our grown folks would always warn us before we left the house, because they feared for our lives being young black males in America. We fought back and it's time we do so again.
I stopped carrying a gun, but since it's legal now for me to be judged as out of my place and I can get shot for that reason, I'm going to see to it I'm not going out like that. From now on I will be armed, locked and loaded.

I have sons and grandchildren. My sons are grown, but my 16, 17, and 21 year old grand kids are going to be taking conceal carry classes starting immediately. I'm going to make certain they follow the law. The same law that makes it alright for them to be shot at the whim of some racist fool, gives them the right to shoot back, or if need be, shoot first.
I'm not going to sit back and allow this open season on black people to be visited upon my grandchildren.

I'm sickened by this cheap value placed upon our black people. I'm fighting back.
As of this afternoon Sandford Fl has taken down their chamber of commerce and tourism contacts. I'm certain it because of cowardice in not wanting to get the kind of email I'm going to send them, but I can wait.
You can bet I'll not spend another dime in that city or state. And I'll recommend that action to any and all until justice is served. That's just some of what my communication will be to Sandford.

I hope this sickening travesty awakens a great giant in the black community. We need to use our economic power to fight back. We need to use force to fight back. We need to defend ourselves by any means necessary.


I hope Zimmerman is brought up on civil charges immediately. Not guilty does not in any way mean innocent. If any want to argue a defense that Zimmerman should not be charged in civil court, I want to hear the same defense for OJ or your credibility will be zero.
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