Author Topic: Black History  (Read 431829 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1526 on: August 30, 2012, 06:04 PM »
I have no words to describe my outrage at this type of racist contempt.  Thanks G for bringing this to our attention.
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Offline Mystic1

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1527 on: August 31, 2012, 12:27 AM »
Ignorance knows no bounds. Rush Limbaugh - is he still on drugs or somethin'?
Pat Robertson - shouldn't he be on some sort of medication already? I mean, c'mon, I tell people I hear voices once and they want to lock me up - he's been doin' it for years and on national television no less. Makes you wonder.   :tongue
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1528 on: September 04, 2012, 03:01 PM »
The old folks used to say, 'if life gives you nothing but  lemons, make lemonade.' We all know that means to make soemthing positive out of the negative, and we all know its easier said than done. But it can be done.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/02/us/playmaking-girls-juvenile-justice/index.html?hpt=hp_bn1

We need more of these kind of people.

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1529 on: September 08, 2012, 09:05 PM »
http://www.dailykos.com/story/2012/08/28/1125295/-GOP-attendee-throws-nuts-at-African-American-CNN-camera-woman-This-is-how-we-feed-animals

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/28/republican-cnn-attack-animal-peanuts-racist_n_1838249.html

http://hinterlandgazette.com/tag/rnc-delegates-throw-nuts-at-patricia-carroll

http://mije.org/richardprince/cnn-camerawoman-not-surprised-peanut-throwing

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/08/29/wolf-blitzer-cnn-racist-attack-camerawoman_n_1841316.html

Just so I won't be accused of making things up, which in fact is what a lot of the apologists are doing in the comment sections, here's a link with Patricia Carroll telling her own story...plus a report on how the Porto Rico representative was shouted down as he was at the podium supporting Romney.


Another glaring example of what racism looks like. Not surprising to me at all where this incident took place.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1530 on: September 10, 2012, 04:05 PM »
First African-American woman to earn commercial pilot's license challenged racism head-on.

Meet Janet Bragg:
 
     
Quote
2/9/2012 - FORT GEORGE G. MEADE, Md. (AFNS) -- A Chicago registered nurse would go on to become the first African-American female to hold a commercial pilot's license.

Janet Bragg was born in March of 1907 in Griffin, Ga., and after graduation from an Episcopal school, attended college at Spelman Seminary in Atlanta where she earned a registered nursing degree in 1929.

After obtaining a nursing position at Wilson Hospital in Chicago, Bragg decided in 1933 to attend the Aeronautical University ground school, where she learned the basics in meteorology, aeronautics and aircraft maintenance. But, because the school had no airplane, there was no type of flight training available.

Bragg decided to change all of that. Making the decision that it would be cheaper to buy a plane, rather than rent one, she bought her first plane for $600 -- one of three that she would eventually purchase. Next came the issue of an airport to use for the training. Because black pilots were not allowed to fly out of airfields used by white pilots, Bragg decided that if black pilots were going to fly, she would need to set up her own airfield. With the help of her instructors at the Aeronautical University, Bragg created the Challenger Aero Club and together they purchased land and built an airfield in the all-black community of Robbins, Ill.

In the spring of 1934, after amassing 35 solo hours, Bragg passed the test for her private pilot's license. She continued her interest in aviation, writing a weekly column in the all African-American newspaper, the Chicago Defender, called "Negro Aviation," and continued to generate an interest in flying for the Chicago area African-American community.

In 1943 Bragg, and several other African-American female pilots, applied for duty with the Women's Airforce Service Pilots to do their part during World War II. But again they were rejected because of their race. She attended instead the Civilian Pilot Training Program flight school at Tuskegee, Alabama, intending to obtain a commercial pilot's license. She successfully completed the course work and flight tests, but was prevented from receiving her license by a bigoted instructor.

Not to be deterred, she went to Chicago, where she passed the examination and earned the first commercial pilot's license ever issued to a black woman.

Bragg, along with her brother, decided to go into the nursing home business and successfully owned and operated several nursing homes into the 1970s. She passed away in Blue Island, Ill., near Chicago, in 1993 at the age of 86.

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Offline Kay

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1531 on: September 10, 2012, 06:11 PM »
Earl, I enjoyed reading about this lady. Thank you for posting this. It made me remember my mother, a nurse during WWII.  :rose

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1532 on: September 12, 2012, 11:42 AM »
You are welcomed Kay. I remember you spoke of your mother having quite some experiences during the war. My dad wouldn't talk about it much. We did some research on our own and found he was awarded two purple hearts and a bronze star.

I look forward to hearing from you again.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1533 on: September 12, 2012, 01:43 PM »
It always comes to pass that the truth rises to the top. Takes time and some just will not be swayed from their idiocy, but for the most part the American people eventually sees through the deceptions and, yes, racism that passes for truth.

Which brings me to this article. The American people are finally getting it. Of course the tea-baggers will hold on to whatever deceptions they can, as they have nothing else, but it seems the country as a whole is getting tired of these idiots.

http://news.yahoo.com/pat-boone-sheriff-joes-arizona-birther-party-scrapped-230134981--abc-news-politics.html



Another example of stupid is as stupid does.
How many of you have had a good ole bear hug, or given one? I've had many and I'm a hugger that gives many. Sooooo just how does an idiot make that a negative?

http://news.yahoo.com/boycott-against-obamas-bear-hugging-buddy-failing-miserably-010918049.html?_esi=1


FYI...I post this link so an understanding can be had on just what YELP is.
http://www.prweb.com/releases/yelp-reviews-obama/big-apple-pizza/prweb9894335.htm
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1534 on: September 12, 2012, 02:14 PM »
I post this as a human interest story we all should learn from. We (I) don't mean to stare when we see someone different, but we do. I try not to and I'm really making a deliberate effort in improving on that failure. This video gives us all a much needed insight on how a person feels being stared at.  Bless this lady and the lesson she brings.

"

http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/.element/apps/cvp/3.0/swf/cnn_416x234_embed.swf?context=embed&videoId=us/2012/09/12/ugliest-woman-lizzie-beauty-ddrew.cnn
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Offline Kay

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1535 on: September 12, 2012, 04:48 PM »
That's wonderful that he was honored in that way. Isn't it true that often times the truest heroes are the quiet ones?  :rose


You are welcomed Kay. I remember you spoke of your mother having quite some experiences during the war. My dad wouldn't talk about it much. We did some research on our own and found he was awarded two purple hearts and a bronze star.

I look forward to hearing from you again.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1536 on: September 17, 2012, 12:40 PM »
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...it was the Dutch and the British who set the pattern for racism in North America, South Africa, and Australia. In each of these places, racism gradually gave way to one of its cousins—segregation. At about the same time, racism as a "scientific" theory began to take hold in Europe, particularly in Germany.


Quote
It was the white control of the worship [on slave-holding plantations], the inability to accept blacks as equals, and the negation of black personhood that led to the separation of the black church from the white church and to the emergence of a black religious community."

Independent black churches—most of them Baptist or Methodist—"were not separating themselves from whites because they held a different doctrinal view of Christianity," notes James H. Cone of Union Theological Seminary. "Without exception, blacks used the same articles of faith and polity for their churches as the white denominations from which they separated. Separation, for blacks, meant that . . . they were rejecting racism that was based on the assumption that God created blacks inferior to whites."


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Looking back on this nation's racist history, former member of Congress and Jesuit Father Robert F. Drinan observes, "It is incredible that in a nation with profoundly Christian roots such a thing could have happened."


These are excerpts from a most interesting article on religion and racism. Most African Americans my age have a very clear memory and understanding of how religion was used against us right through the 60s. Even to this day we have the Pat Robinson, Falwell crazed view and the wink and nods from those that still skew their theology to make it alright to pray for President Obama's death and such like things.

Of course there are several blanks to be filled in on this subject. Do just that here:
http://salt.claretianpubs.org/issues/racism/unsworth.html
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1537 on: September 17, 2012, 12:59 PM »
Quote
We have much in common and are, at times, frighteningly alike. But then there is this thing that permeates the world around us, that drives so much of what we discuss and how we see the world: I am black, and you are white.


I put those words in red because I wanted them to stand out. I want you guys to understand that is what this letter is all about. All the 'just get over it' people, all the curious people, all the people that just have no clue of how narratives develop or why because they have no experience on the matter, and all the black people, especially the young ones who are allowing themselves to be duped into believing the whitewashed version of our history...pay close attention to a letter between two friends, one black and one white, that explains the intricacies of what happens, why it happens, and why our narratives are compelled to be so different.

http://salt.claretianpubs.org/issues/racism/walton.html
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1538 on: September 18, 2012, 12:17 PM »
Hey G, remember back in posts 1565 & 1566 we talked about eugenics and the terrible things that happened to people during a time when this was freely practiced?

Well this article appeared in our local paper this morning and it almost knocked me out of my seat. I've known this man for over 30 years and he's never spoke of this. His story makes this shockingly real and personal.

http://www2.newsadvance.com/news/2012/sep/15/us-marine-vet-two-wars-was-sterilized-state-13-ar-2208707/
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #1539 on: September 18, 2012, 01:37 PM »
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.