Author Topic: Black History  (Read 452396 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #420 on: October 17, 2008, 11:40 PM »
I have no idea who wrote this. I got it in the e-mail and in my opinion its a good answer to a dumb question.

Quote
Just Because He's Black

A white man asked his black friend, 'Are you voting for Barack Obama
just because he's black?'

The black man responded by saying, 'Why not? Hell, in this country men
are pulled over everyday just cause they're black; passed over for
promotions just cause they're black; considered to be criminals just
cause they're black; and there are going to be thousands of you who
won't be voting for him just because he's black! However, you do not
seem to have a problem with that! This country was built with the sweat
and whip off the black slaves' back, and now a descendent of those same
slaves has a chance to lead the same country, where we weren't even
considered to be people, where we weren't allowed to be educated, drink
from the same water fountains, eat in the same restaurants, or even
vote. So yes! I'm going to vote for him! But it's not just because he's
black, but because he is hope, he is change, and he now allows me to
understand when my grandson says that he wants to be president when he
grows up, it is not a fairy tale but a short term goal. He now sees,
understands and knows that he can achieve, withstand and do

ANYTHING
just because he's black!'

By the way, when Jesse Jackson ran for president, when Al Sharpton ran, when Shirley Chissum ran and now with Obama running many people think this is an intelligent question.  Now if this is such an intelligent question, why is it one never hears this question put to white voters who vote for the white candidate?
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #421 on: October 22, 2008, 02:31 PM »
Excellent stuff, as usual Earl...Good to read here again...
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Offline Marsupial Man

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Re: Black History
« Reply #422 on: October 22, 2008, 02:53 PM »
There's a tremendous amount of truth in those words.

Offline Burk28

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Re: Black History
« Reply #423 on: October 22, 2008, 04:10 PM »
Witt, thanks very much for your lengthy response to my piece, it is much appreciated,
Love is the brilliant trumpet,
shattering the silence in me forever

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #424 on: October 26, 2008, 04:02 AM »
Paris, Tx , stung by the public national exposure of its racist injustice in the local courts, is trying to put its best face forward on another incident that will bring well deserved negative exposure.
Anybody remember the dragging death of James Byrd in Jasper, Tx about 10 years ago? Well I'm not at all surprised to read that Paris, Tx has now joined that infamous list:
http://dallassouthblog.com/2008/10/04/howard-wittchicago-tribune-with-more-on-death-of-brandon-mcclelland/
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #425 on: October 28, 2008, 09:27 AM »
A classic example of the terrorists that exist in this country that are ignored everyday in favor of only portraying people of color as terroist.

http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20081027/Skinhead.Plot/
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Offline 7

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Re: Black History
« Reply #426 on: October 28, 2008, 09:39 PM »
A classic example of the terroists  that exist in this country that are ignored everyday in favor of only portraying people of color as terroist.

http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-general/20081027/Skinhead.Plot/


Friend,

Possibly the catalyst behind your example:

[yt=425,350]U5mdIPNB8t8[/yt]

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #427 on: October 29, 2008, 08:48 AM »
T7L now that was chilling for more reasons than one. What Palin and McCain are doing is nothing new. This is the way racists undervalue, underestimate, demonize and marginalize black people. It's cultural conditioning that sets in motion and uses fear as its weapon. They use that to play to the lowest common denominator because it has always worked. Lie, obfuscate, distort, decieve; anything to make the black man a fearsome beast undeserving of respect. And they repeat the lies over and over again in spite of all truthful facts that's readily available.

The screen shot where that idiot had a toy monkey with an Obama hat on it brought back a frightening experience in my life. Dr. Martin Luther King was in my hometown for a speaking engagement back in 1962. I was 12 years old. My mother sent me and my twin brother to the A&P store which was several blocks away. We had to walk past the city armory to get there. I'm certain mom would have never sent us if she had known the local KKK and supporters had gathered in front of the armory. As we walked by these brave citizens began jeering and shouting nigger at us while they paraded a monkey on a leash with a Martin Luther Coon sign around his neck. I can't tell you how frightening that was to a child.

You see folks, this stuff ain't no joke or play thing. The clowns on this tape thinks its funny. This crap is not funny. This is race baiting and red baiting at its finest. It is simply outrageous to claim this is even remotely related to fairness. This ginning up of racial hatred causes people to get killed. What Palin and McCain are doing is exactly what the lynch mobs did before they dragged some black person off to be murdered. The proof is a matter of historical record. Right wing radio knows it, McCain and Palin know it, the agents of hate they are appealing to knows it, and that's exactly why they are using that tactic today.
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Offline WordFaery

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Re: Black History
« Reply #428 on: November 05, 2008, 04:57 AM »
Uncrowned Queens oral history on WNED AM radio

"Uncrowned Queens: Voices of African American Women," an oral history project highlighting the accomplishments and viewpoints of exceptional Buffalo area African American women began airing the first of its 13 hour long segments this past Friday afternoon at 1 p.m. on WNED-AM 970.  The first program, featuring profiles of community business woman Dee Cosby, Food Bank of Western New York founder Carolyn Thomas, and New York State Assembly member Crystal Peoples was repeated this past Sunday evening at 7 p.m.

The radio series is produced by the Western New York Public Broadcasting Association in conjunction with the Buffalo-based Uncrowned Queens Institute for Research & Education on Women, Inc.  Among the women featured are upcoming programs--all of which will be aired at 1 p.m. on Friday afternoons and repeated on Sundays at 7 p.m.--are librarian Glendora Johnson-Cooper; choir director and music teacher Ella Robinson; nurse and UB faculty member Dr. Juanita Hunter; and Executive Director of the Arts Council of Buffalo and Erie County Celeste Lawson.

Each hour-long program is introduced by Award-winning actress and The Cosby Show co-star Phylicia Rashad.  Future plans call for distributing the series nationally and encouraging other public broadcasting stations to contribute stories of their own regions' "Uncrowned Queens."

Lorna C. Hill, a playwright, actor and founder of Buffalo's Ujima Theater Company produced the series for WNED Radio, with WNED's Stratton Rawson serving as the Executive Producer.  Dr. Peggy Brooks-Bertram, Ph.D., and Dr. Barbara A. Seals Nevergold, Ph.D. of the Uncrowned Queens Institute served as Consulting Producers.  The project is funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, with support from BlueCross BlueShield of Western New York and Rich Products.

In a unique partnership with Regent Broadcasting of Buffalo, WNED is offering special abbreviated editions of "Uncrowned Queens" to air on WBLK 93.7 FM (a commercial radio station) on Sundays at 8:30 am.  The goal of the of the half hour broadcasts is to reach a audience that does not listen regularly to public radio.

For more information about the Uncrowned Queens Institute, visit their web site:

http://wings.buffalo.edu/uncrownedqueens/index.html
"Come Fairies, take me out of this dull world for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame."      W.B. Yeats



Word Faery

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #429 on: November 05, 2008, 05:51 AM »
Great link again WordFaery. I'll use some of that information in the thread.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #430 on: November 05, 2008, 06:34 AM »
Yup T7L Nov 4 2008, a day of monumental history.
America stands a little taller on so many different levels today. Race baiting and red baiting politics have been repudiated. The politics of lies and smears from such hate hags as Limbaugh, Hannity, ORilely, just to name a few, repudiated. Joe the plumber who was not only a fraud, but dumber than a rock, repudiated. A new era has dawned where people want to decide their elections based on issues rather than fall for the okey-doke and bamboozling from the right.

Black America stands taller with the quiet dignity this day affords us. Not one black person I know in my generation believed we would ever live to see a day when a black man would be president. I can't tell you the exhilaration I feel knowing I can look my own grandchildren in the eye and finally be able to say truthfully they can be what ever they want to be. Mind you, I'm not fooled for one minute into thinking black folks have arrived and the fight against racism and injustice has been won. We still have a fight ahead of us, but today America made a giant step forward.

To my black people; celebrate, crow, chest bump, revel in this unprecedented victory....today. Do so with the dignity befitting the occasion...today. Tomorrow the work starts. Don't let your guard down. Not only do we have to get behind Obama and support him because the hate hag machine will still be in full force, but we must not allow our expectation of change to fall by the wayside.
We must demand the same accountability from Obama and the new Democratic Congress as we would anyone else. No free passes for Obama or any of the others. History is one thing, living up to history is quite another story.
The issue has been decided. Lets see what Obama will make of it.
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Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #431 on: November 06, 2008, 12:42 AM »
"I'm so proud and filled, I can hardly talk without weeping. I'm so filled with pride for my country. What do you say? We are growing up. My God, I'm so grateful.... I mean, look at our souls, look at our hearts. We have elected a black man to talk for us, to speak for us. We, blacks, whites, Asians, Spanish-speaking, Native Americans, we have done it. Fat, thin, pretty, plain, gay, straight, we have done it. My Lord, I am an American, baby."
-Maya Angelou

Today  I watched clip after clip of the tears and pride and joy from black people all over America...and the message was the same: "Now I can look at my children and grandchildren and tell them with assurity...."you CAN
be anything you want to be" and also---"now there are no more excuses---that you didn't have a father---because Barack didn't have a father"---It was a beautiful thing to FEEL them lifted...

I agree with Earl...about the "congratulating, chest bumping, celebrating, crowing, revelling...it's a historical day!

But his next sentence was profound:  "Tomorrow the work starts. Don't let your guard down. Not only do we have to get behind Obama and support him because the hate hag machine will still be in full force, but we must not allow our expectation of change to fall by the wayside."   

I believe President-Elect Obama has what it takes to be GREAT...and I have hope that change will come.   It was also great to hear how the rest of the world is celebrating with us...FINALLY they see America's spirit!  It will take ALL of us...to put aside our differences and pull America out of the muck...

Let's show em what AMERICANS are made of!   

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #432 on: November 06, 2008, 04:57 AM »
Elise...the prodigal daughter returns. Welcome back hugsssssssssssssss. I'll save you an email and give you my take on this right here.

Being a serious student of Black History, I'm still giddy. I well remember when I couldn't walk through a front door or drink from a water fountain. I remember when I had to cross the street if a white man was on the sidewalk where I was. I remember when the last words we heard from grandma or mom before we went out the door was 'now you remember your place'. It was a warning to us not to do anything that may breech the rules of racism we had to live by. They knew the serious consequences of that. I'm only now beginning to understand the fear a black mother had for her children back then. Especially her sons, as we could be beaten or even lynched with impunity for the slightest breech of the racist code.

And here I am being a part of history that will be written about and studied for as long as American history exist. I'm thinking of my parents, aunts, uncles, my grandparents, none of them lived to see this day. The freedom riders that were murdered in Philadelphia, Miss died for this moment. Medgar Evers was murdered trying to get black folks registered to vote. Dr King's home was bombed and he was martyred for this day. Emmitt Till, those four littel girls blown up in a church in Birmingham, Al., all the dog attacks and discrimination led to this day.
I wonder what the slaves would have thought of this day. Just think, the black man was brought here the the bows of ships where so many died that the sharks learned to follow the ships during the middle passage to feed on their bodies. The survivors where not even considered full humans, just chattel. The girls and women raped at will, children and babies ripped from mother's arms and here I am actually seeing a black man as president. Its indescribable.

On the way home tonight I parked on the lot of Fort Early. This was the Fort that Robert E. Lee was trying to retreat to from Appomattox, Va. in order to continue the war and save the Confederacy. The original cobblestone lines the driveway. The original walls and breast works are still there. The building is used for weddings and such. I sat on one of the walls thinking of how this place, that's about 8 blocks from my house, had its intended purpose of keeping my people slaves. Through all the blood and tears, death and sacrifices, struggles and struggles to come, here I am owning property just a few blocks from this place, with the status of a full man and witnessing a black man going to the Whitehouse.
Contemplate that for a moment in the light of historical context. Now multiply that feeling X times and you might come close to feeling how huge this is in black history.
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline elise

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Re: Black History
« Reply #433 on: November 06, 2008, 05:57 AM »
*hugggs* to you "Dad"!!!   How could I resist?   

I heard someone say something today that struck me...they said (and I wish I remembered who it was) that Obama is where he is because he is standing on the shoulders of those who went before him...those who did their part for civil liberties...including but not limited to the slaves who suffered, died, escaped...names we don't know, and names we know...Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Martin Luther King...Rosa Parks...etc...etc ...etc.     Also the courageous white men...Abraham Lincoln, John Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and others who stood up against  the system...
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I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson