Author Topic: Black History  (Read 447219 times)

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Offline 7

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Re: Black History
« Reply #406 on: September 08, 2008, 10:15 PM »

But you are right T7L. A deeper research would have helped. I keep asking myself...who knew?? In todays time it never even occurred to me to research a tourism place for racism. Lesson learned.




To be honest, anywhere within the bible belt, Id be especially careful. The extreme religious are usually extremely nuts.





Offline Kay

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Re: Black History
« Reply #407 on: September 15, 2008, 06:45 PM »
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It never ceases to amaze me that there are people out there who so vehemently hate other people because of skin color.

ain't that the truth and Paul, it doesn't stop there. It goes
beyond skin color. People prejudge for beliefs, neighborhoods,
types of clothing, what they call "class"
I have a beautiful daughter in law who is Asian, from Eastern
Europe. She has gorgeous skin and lovely eyes. My grandchild
who will be born next year will no doubt share that along
with my son's blond hair and other features. All I can
say is I stand ready to defend that child against
anyone who dare speak out against him or her,
sorry to get on a soap box. People label people all the time
and lump them all together and that's sad. Without getting
to know a person, we never know the beauty of each human
soul and that skin color doesn't mean a thing when we
all die and go to bones or ash. It's so stupid.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #408 on: September 15, 2008, 08:57 PM »
I stand with you Kay, every word.

By the way, you're welcome to bring your soap box here any time.
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Offline Kay

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Re: Black History
« Reply #409 on: September 15, 2008, 09:46 PM »
I just may do that  :kisslady

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #410 on: September 22, 2008, 02:54 AM »
This follows up on the previous discussion about The 1959 school closings in Prince Edward county, Va. They closed the schools rather than segregate and kept them closed until the 1964 Civil Rights Act and it took until 1966 to get them fully opened and intergrated. The county seat was Farmville, Va and from there began what would come to be known as the Massive Resistance movement against the Supreme Court ordered desegregation.

On Friday September 19 2008 a funeral was held for one Lester Edison Andrews Sr. He was 93.
Mr. Edwards was the chairman of the Prince Edward County School Board when they closed the schools in 1959. In 2004 Mr. Andrews said in an interview to the Richmond Times Dispatch, "I didn't want to close the schools, but the people were clamoring for it."

A personal observation about that quote. When he says the 'people' were clamoring for it he obviously didn't consider black folks to be people. These black non-people struggled to get places to educate their non-people children, or, in most cases, these non-people children went without an education.

I'm sure Mr. Andrews was caught up in the dictates of the Jim Crow laws of the time, so I make no judgement on him now. It is of note that he resigned from the school board later, though I can find no connection to that and the decision to close the schools.

Mr. Lacy Ward, who now runs the R. R. Moton Museum (which was the black school at the time where the civil rights struggle began in full earnest), said he couldn't say with certainty today where Mr. Andrews stood on intergration. " His funeral was not segregated. His funeral was very much intergrated."
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #411 on: September 24, 2008, 07:01 PM »
http://www.centralhigh57.org/the_tiger.htm#Sept. 19

{Just as an aside, it seems we are led to believe all the race riots are by black people. Whereas there have been black race riots the news and history don't cover the white race riots with the same fervor. Greenwood, Wilmington and other places where whites rioted, killed blacks by the hundreds, even burning down whole black communities, and many times law enforcement and politicians stood by and watched or were complicit in these actions. To this day no one has been called into account for the deaths and destruction. I might do a study on this subject if you guys want it.}

"Imagine that it's the night before your first day of High School. You're filled with excitement, fear and tension. You wonder what the school will be like. Will the classes be hard? Will the students like you? Will the teachers be friendly? You want to fit in. Your stomach is full of butterflies as you try to sleep and wonder what tomorrow will be like.
Now imagine that you are a black student in 1957 preparing to go to Little Rock Central High School to attempt what seemed impossible -- the integration of public schools. . ." :

http://littlerock.about.com/cs/centralhigh/a/Integration.htmhttp://afroamhistory.about.com/od/schoolintegration/ig/School-Integration/Brown.htm

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #412 on: September 24, 2008, 07:16 PM »
The nastiness of racism raises its head again in this political race. I expect it to get worse.
There's a flyer being left on doors that juxtaposes Barrack Obama with the leaders of other African Nations. The claim is all nations lead by black people have poor economies, has poverty, are poorly lead and have wars. I forget where it was exactly because it was about a 10 second piece on the news, but when I get more details I'll post them.

Now before anyone takes me to task and says I'm making too much of this and its not racist, concider this.
Has any white led nation been free of war? Has any white led nation been free of poverty? Just look at the U. S. A. right now. Is the economy falling down around our heads right now? Were the leaders that orchestrated the economic failures we see black or white? Have our white leaders kept us out of wars or poverty? Has the leadership of this country been peachy keen the last eight years?
One thing is for certain. The condition(s) and sad state of affairs this country has been in and out of, and back into today, cannot in any way be blamed on any black man or any women. The leaders have always been white men. Does that disqualify all other white men from leading?

Now ask yourself this.
In the light of it being true that both white and black leaders face the same problems, can anybody say it has been a black man leading this country to the disaster we face today? Further, ask if at any time a white leader of any nation has been held up to the kind of scrutiny that says no white man can be a leader of a country because another white leader failed?

I can remember all the way back to Eisenhower and I cannot recall a single campaign making an issue to disqualify all other white men from being leaders, because another white man failed.
Using this logic, surely Hitler, Stalin, David Duke, George Wallace, even George Bush would disqualify all white men from any leadership positions.

Racism at its best.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #413 on: October 04, 2008, 04:45 AM »
Katrina Brown is a film maker  attending a historical� Episcopalian event today. 10/04/2008 will be a day marked by history as a giant leap forward for the Episcopalian church. Here's a quote from Katrina Brown about this event:
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"I get push-back from whites: 'My people weren't here, and I'm not racist, so this isn't my problem. You don't have to be a bad, intentionally racist person to be benefiting from a system that still has inequities built into it."


What is she talking about? What is this history making event?

http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/stories/E/EPISCOPALIANS_SLAVERY_APOLOGY?SITE=VALYD&SECTION=HOME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2008-10-03-21-24-50
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #414 on: October 05, 2008, 03:43 AM »
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #415 on: October 10, 2008, 06:38 PM »
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=2415

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Anybody remember the 1956 R&B hit 'SINCE I MET YOU BABY'?
This date in 1914 the R&B giant Ivory Joe Hunter was born.
Fifties era white artists such as Pat Boone often rerecorded Ivory Hunter's songs as cross over hits. In the sixties Ivory Joe Hunter made a comeback in country western music and appeared often at the Grand Ole Opry.
Ivory Joe Hunter is credited with writing more than 7,000 songs. Among them are two that Elvis Presley put in the top twenty: My Wish Came True and Ain't That Loving You Baby.

Ivory Joe Hunter developed lung cancer and died in Memphis in 1974.
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=1209

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Frederick Douglas Patterson was born this date 1901.
He was an African-American doctor and education administrator.

From Washington, D. C., his family moved to Texas at an early age. Frederick Douglass Patterson received both a doctorate in veterinary medicine (1923) and a Master of Science (1927) from Iowa State College; he also attended Cornell University (Ph.D.; 1932). He taught at Virginia State College in Petersburg before joining Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute in Alabama (1928), where he headed the veterinary division, served as director of the School of Agriculture, and then became the institutes's third president.

He was president of Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (later Tuskegee Institute; now Tuskegee University) in 1935-53. During this time (1944) he was the founder of the United Negro College Fund (UNCF). The United Negro College Fund, a fund raising organization for historically black private colleges, administered programs and granted scholarships. By the year of Patterson's death it was providing funds for 42 member colleges, aiding some 45,000 students. In the mid-1970s Patterson devised the College Endowment Funding Plan, a program that depended on funds from private businesses that were matched with federal moneys.

He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1987. Frederick Patterson educator and prominent Black leader died on April 26, 1988 in New Rochelle, N. Y.

Reference:
Outside In
African-American History in Iowa 1838-2000
by Bill Silag, Susan-Koch Bridgford, Hal Chase
Copyright 2001

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October 10, 1850, Francis James Grimke was born. Talk about a story full of contrast, man this is it.
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=1210

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On this date in 1935 Porgy and Bess opened on Broadway. This was the first American folk opera about the lives of Black Americans. The stories setting was in Charleston S.C.

It took place at The Alvin Theatre which opened in 1927 and named for Alex Aarons and Vinton Freedley who produced a string of hits such as Lady Be Good, Tip Toes and Oh Kay with other scores by George and Ira Gershwin. The Schubert Organization purchased the Alvin Theatre, and in 1983 named it the Neil Simon Theatre

That evening, Porgy and Bess was cast with Anne Wiggins Brown and Todd Duncan in starring roles.

Reference: Anne Wiggins Brown
Todd Duncan
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Offline Burk28

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Re: Black History
« Reply #416 on: October 12, 2008, 03:05 AM »
A Poet Questions
I listened to  an ignorant man speak today, A bias, racist tirade. My ears and heart stung with each syllable of hate he uttered. Is it not sad that in a day such as ours that  persons such as these still exist?

I was incensed at the mere possibility that this fool might think that I approved of such viewpoints and prejudices. But yet, I said nothing to him, I only listened to his goings on and empty justifications as to why he felt this way.

In what light then am I left in? My silence; did it fuel his racist diatribe, Or… was he a tool so that I might use it as inspiration and yet another insight to write this small but nevertheless important piece?

The tools that come to hand, come in many different forms. Our inspirations, motivations come from those areas that most times we abhor. Our outrage fuels us to action, I often wonder after such experiences, if not for them then what would I write about?

Oh yes, the Golden field’s of Autumn evenings, the lover’s hand across my chest and brow. The kindness of my fellow man, and his sacrifice. These reflections of pure light.
However, there are moments when one must write of the darkness to rid themselves of it.

Do I justify the actions of an ignorant lout who speaks hate and distrust? Never, But I find myself at an impasse of  conscience understanding, Is this hateful thing the vehicle through these words of its own destruction?

Perhaps an inflicted death blow wielded by a poor poets pen, to envision a time when thoughts such as these do not exist? What then will the poets write of, what then will be the inspiration? Is it a sin to write of these things, my fear of perpetuating the cause of this  discourse weighs heavily upon me.

Is the poet, the writer, addicted to these heartaches and dysfunctions of his fellow man,
No I think not, We are witnesses to the coming of age of this world. In our lifetimes we will walk but a short mile in it; and while here I for one will share such things.

I will battle these questions in my own time and pray for peaceful tongues and cleansed hearts. Cleansed of prejudice and hate.




Love is the brilliant trumpet,
shattering the silence in me forever

Offline WordFaery

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Re: Black History
« Reply #417 on: October 12, 2008, 12:47 PM »
Historical item from today's Buffalo News.

UB researcher's work spurs honor for slave

http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/461269.html
"Come Fairies, take me out of this dull world for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame."      W.B. Yeats



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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #418 on: October 17, 2008, 09:56 PM »
Wordfaery that was a beautiful link. Thank you for sharing it.
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Re: Black History
« Reply #419 on: October 17, 2008, 10:50 PM »
Thanks for moving this here Burk. I delayed comment to give time and see what conversation it would provoke. Whereas this topic does not get a ton of responses, it does get a high number of hits. So I can assure you your post has been read a number of times.

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I listened to an ignorant man speak today, A bias, racist tirade. My ears and heart stung with each syllable of hate he uttered. Is it not sad that in a day such as ours that persons such as these still exist?

Unfortunately I hear this just about everyday. It doesn't come out as a blatant tirade all the time, but the code words and subtleties sting just as bad.

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I was incensed at the mere possibility that this fool might think that I approved of such viewpoints and prejudices. But yet, I said nothing to him, I only listened to his goings on and empty justifications as to why he felt this way.

In what light then am I left in? My silence; did it fuel his racist diatribe...

You touched on something here. The racist absolutely DOES believe everyone else believes and approves of his view points. They are so abused by their own inbred hate, they just can't fathom the idea of anything else. I don't find it unusual that you said nothing for a couple of reasons.
a) If you're a person given to the idea of justice and equality, these rantings take you completly off gaurd.
b) I often find myself just shaking my head in silence. How do you respond right off the top of your head to a complete fool? One realizes the futility of having a reasoned conversation and oft times all you end with is a low brow shouting match.


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In what light then am I left in? My silence; did it fuel his racist diatribe, Or was he a tool so that I might use it as inspiration and yet another insight to write this small but nevertheless important piece?

Your are left in an enlightened position. What you bore witness too is the exact things we black people have to face and defend against everyday somewhere. The media, the office, the eatery, talk shows, political campaigns, the CB radio, op-ed pages, just on and on.
No your silence didn't fuel his view. What fuels this kind of hate is the collective denial that it still exist. There are numerous types of these kind of racist hate filled terrorist cells in this country just waiting for their catalysis to start a race war. Yet all we see portrayed as terroists are dark skinned people.
I won't take time to look up every quote, but I've read where those like David Duke and his types of groups are saying having a black elected as president would be their catalysis.

As to him being a tool as inspiration, well that's in interesting way to define it, but stranger things have happened. Perhaps you have a good point. If that hadn't happened, what reason would you have to think of this and give us all reason to ponder these questions?


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The tools that come to hand, come in many different forms. Our inspirations, motivations come from those areas that most times we abhor. Our outrage fuels us to action, I often wonder after such experiences, if not for them then what would I write about?

It is unfortunate that more of us don't do the same. I applaud you for taking the time not only to relate this experience, but to teach lessons from this outrageous experience.

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Do I justify the actions of an ignorant lout who speaks hate and distrust?

Most times we don't speak of these things out of fear. Fear that we might offend, fear that we give audience to such ugliness. However these types grow in the dark. They need exposure. The old 'give them enough rope to hangs themselves' routine.

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I will battle these questions in my own time and pray for peaceful tongues and cleansed hearts. Cleansed of prejudice and hate.

Long have we black folks been doing that. We welcome all that want to join in that effort.

Good food for thought Burk. Hopefuly there will be more follow up.

Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.