Author Topic: Black History  (Read 447214 times)

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Offline cappy

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Re: Black History
« Reply #378 on: July 13, 2008, 12:30 AM »
Thanks for the post Cappy. This is real history.

I found this link this morning. It has pictures in real time at the County seat in Farmville, Va.
The article is short, but the pictures sets the mood of the times.

http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whoweare/exhibits/brown/decision.htm


I can remember when the family drove through Prince Edward County that Dad was extra careful not to draw attention to us. Being so young at the time I was confused about what all of the ruckus was about. Why close schools? Where would everyone go to school? There was much discussion in all of the black communities as you can well imagine.

I am pleased that Farmville is doining this. No healing can take place without it.

Offline cappy

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Re: Black History
« Reply #379 on: July 13, 2008, 01:33 AM »
Thanks, cappy, for the reminder. I practically grew up at the public pool. Or, should I say that I'm lucky that I grew up at all because I usually stayed at the bottom of the pool, so my mom tells me. She was always having to fish me out. I finally did learn to swim, however and was there at the pool every chance that I got. Every morning and every afternoon. We had to rest at lunch time due to polio. (That was before the vaccine. That dates me, doesn't it?)
Anyway, our town did the same thing. They filled over the pool for the same reason. I remember crying and crying. I couldn't understand why because I sure didn't mind who came to swim. We could all play together. To this day when I go back home for a visit, I drive by where the old pool was and wish that people didn't have such hate in their hearts. The children sure didn't!

Wow that is the first time that I have heard that another locality did this. Somehow this never occurred to me.

Any way there is a postscript to the story. The city built an Olympic pool right in the same place that the other was filled in. After all of these years I find that I could not go to that pool. I was angry that the city sold this preposterous idea that they were doing something good for the citizens.

This year I had an opportunity to get to know a city council woman that was heavily involved with the rebuilding project. I talked with her about her experience with getting the pool project moving and her feelings about why the pool was filled in. She was not from this area when that happened. Her motive in fact was to do something good. This was the first time in over forty years that I was faced with my own thought process of hate for that location. The first time I had a reason to think differently than what happened in 1961.  The encounter was revealing, interesting and cleansing. I’m thinking of paying that place a visit.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #380 on: July 14, 2008, 03:30 AM »
Well I'm sure glad you managed not to stay at the bottom of the pool too long Witt.

Cappy, take the plunge. Sorry I just couldn't resist the pun.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #381 on: July 14, 2008, 03:34 AM »
Quote
"I could never adjust to the separate waiting rooms, separate eating places, separate rest rooms, partly because the separate was always unequal, and partly because the very idea of separation did something to my sense of dignity and self-respect."  1958
Who? Martin Luther King.

Quote
"Segregation...not only harms one physically but injures one spiritually...It scars the soul...It is a system which forever stares the segregated in the face, saying 'You are less than...' 'You are not equal to...'"
Again Martin Luther King. I couldn't verify the date.

King's position was one of nonviolence. Was it the right position and if so, why?
Quote
"Hate begets hate; violence begets violence; toughness begets a greater toughness. We must meet the forces of hate with the power of love...Our aim must never be to defeat or humiliate the white man, but to win his friendship and understanding."  1958
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #382 on: July 20, 2008, 03:42 AM »
Take a look around you. Your house, car, where you work, the bridge over the river, that fancy grill in your back yard. How about some components in your TV or stove, all those buildings that make a distinctive sky line. All these things from the most elaborate war machines and the space shuttle right down to the fishing gear in your tackle box have one thing in common... STEEL.

William Kelly of Eddyville, Kentucky in 1847 is largely credited with the invention of steel. Later on Henry Bessemer is credited with reinventing Kelly's method. They make a nice story, but its fiction.

Want to know the origin of the metal that makes our life so pleasant today?
An African tribe known as the Haya's. They had been making refined steel 2000 years before William Kelly.

A most enlightening audio or script link:
http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi385.htm
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Offline Allen

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Re: Black History
« Reply #383 on: July 23, 2008, 03:40 PM »
That is truly fascinating, Earl.  I would never have known that.  Infact, if i was playing one of those "truth or bluff" games, I would surely have lost this one.

Once again, I learn something.  Absolutely brilliant.
Allen

An action promulgated out of desperation will inevitably end in tragedy; for as its anagram so aptly foretells:  A rope ends it. �

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #384 on: July 24, 2008, 06:47 AM »
Thanks for the feed back Allen. I came across this while looking for something else. I'm continualy amazed by these tidbits as well.
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #385 on: July 24, 2008, 02:57 PM »
Very interesting!
Isn't it amazing how people can spin things to be the way they want them to be?  Most of us don't have a clue to most everything. Hey! Is that a Witt's witticism or what?

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #386 on: July 24, 2008, 04:21 PM »
Yes that's a Witt witticism. In fact your witticism touches on the true nature of the problem it addressed. Those that control the pen, control what is written, ergo the spin. We are just touching the tip of the iceberg.

Thanks for following along.
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #387 on: July 26, 2008, 04:28 PM »
26 July 1948 Executive Order 9981 was issued by President Harry Truman. For the first time in American history a legally binding order was set forth to desegregate the Armed Forces.
http://www.redstone.army.mil/history/integrate/eo9981.htmlhttp://www.history.army.mil/books/integration/IAF-fm.htm
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #388 on: August 07, 2008, 03:04 PM »
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=2151


August 6
On this date the American Voting Rights Act of 1965 was passed into law. The most sweeping reforms were embodied in the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=1055http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=1059http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=3075
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #389 on: August 15, 2008, 05:31 AM »
Ever wondered where the Banjo originated?
Thomas Jefferson gave us a clue;
"In his 1785 notes on the State of Virginia, aptly remarked that the slave instrument of choice, "is the Bonjar which they brought hither from Africa."
You say you want details?
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=231

The Door of No Return. Was there such a place? Does it still exist?
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=1519

Now here's something I just learned. When I was growing up there was a cartoon show featuring
Aesop's fables. The old folks would tell stories from Aesop's fables too. They were designed to entertain and teach. I never gave much thought that this was a real person, much less of him being a slave.
Interesting read:
http://www.aaregistry.com/detail.php?id=2333
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #390 on: August 15, 2008, 09:28 AM »
Thanks, MY-FRIEND. I'll have to read these when I get the chance. I've heard the "banjar" story and the Aesop one. Now I'll learn about the door.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #391 on: August 30, 2008, 05:40 PM »
We had a great time. There were three couples, we rented a van and set off on the 1094 mile drive across the Va mountains, Tn mountains, Ak mountains, but the highlight was the Ozarks in Mo. What a sight.

It was rather humorus when we stopped in some places in the back woods of Mo. in the Ozarks. Everything came to a standstill when we walked in. Those guys just weren't used to seeing black people. Fact is, once we went past Little Rock, Ak. we didn't see but a hand full of black folks either.

We laid over in Memphis, Tn. Had BBQ (mine is much better) and went down on Beale street, the capital of the Blues. B. B. King's club was really rocking, but this place was full of music clubs, street singers and venders. We had the pleasure of running into a women's club called the Red Hats. To my understanding they are older women who are divorced, widowed, or otherwise single and they support each other, which includes taking trips. Let me tell you, these 'older women' got the party started. They rocked not only the house, but Beale street.

It was the end of Elvis week that friday night. Lord!! we saw all kinds of Elvis'. Old ones, fat ones, tall ones, young ones, and even baby ones. I'm here to report, much to my dissapointment, I saw no black ones. Humm, mabe next year I could...nahhh.
There was this one outdoor stage that invited Elvis up to sing. We looked around and here came this guy that had to be in his 80s all dreesed up like Elvis, bent over, had to be helped on the stage, but he was in his element. He was pretty good too. It was almost like he morphed into a younger him. Actually as I think about it, it was a beautiful thing to see him enjoy himself so at his age.

Branson, Mo. was a nice place. They have more entertainment venues that NYC. Their population is around 6,000 and their whole industry is tourism. As with any tourism place it was rather expensive. We stayed at a five star resort, thanks to a friend of mind who is an owner. It was beautifull.
The rest of the week was filled with laughter (mostly at my expense), shopping, clubs, shopping, site seeing, shopping, the Branson, Mo. senic R/R, shopping, lakes and parks, we even went on an old fashioned picnic. Ohhhh, did I mention shopping?

They had a replica of the Titianic that had artifacs from the ship and details of the ship's wreck. The detail was amazing, from the period dress of the guides, to the different angles the ship would have been at different stages of sinking, right down to a bowl of water that was tempt controlled to keep it the same as the sea water would have been at the time of the wreck. They invited us to put our hands in to see how long we could take it. I held out for 22 seconds. By then my hand was burning it was so cold. It was the most interesting thing we did, but it was both sad and frightening to have that kind of reality hit you all at once.
 

On the trip back we laid over in Knoxville, Tn. so we could tour some of the Gatlinburg, Pigeon Forge area. The real reason why the wives wanted to go??? you guessed it...shopping.

We got home safe and sound with renewed friendships, pictures, memories and flat broke.
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