Author Topic: Black History  (Read 445487 times)

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #364 on: June 18, 2008, 08:00 PM »
Well here's one that came out of nowhere while I was reading another link.
Anybody remember the Lindy Hop?  For you youngsters, that's a dance.
Where did the Lindy Hop come from?
What influence did it have on other popular dances that we love so dearly now, such as the West Coast Swing?
What does any of this have to do with Black History?

Here's a good start on researching the links between dance and Black History:
http://artsedge.kennedy-center.org/exploring/harlem/themes/lindyhop.html
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #365 on: June 28, 2008, 02:36 AM »
I was going to do a study on dance and black history, but I had an email recently that made me want to see what different people, both modern and late, said about racism. We'll do a study about dance later.

I'll post some quotations from various people just for thought. Some I'll comment on, some I won't, but I hope to spark some honest dialogue about racism.

Quote
We should have learnt by now that laws and court decisions can only point the way. They can establish criteria of right and wrong. And they can provide a basis for rooting out the evils of bigotry and racism. But they cannot wipe away centuries of oppression and injustice however much we might desire it.

I have often said laws do not and can not abolish evil. The only thing that can abolish evil is people. Us, we, they, them and all that 'people' entail, can move from the cultural conditioning of racism, and forward to a mindset of inclusiveness.

Who is this quote from? Hubert Humphrey 6/1/1966 in a Whitehouse conference speech.
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Offline Allen

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Re: Black History
« Reply #366 on: June 28, 2008, 02:53 PM »
This is a very insightful, and well thought out comment.

Of course, in a country such as 21st century America, with its enormous opportunity; ultimately, and with few exceptions, it will be enlightened individual choice which will lead the way to a better life experience for all.

Nevertheless, as Mr. Humphry states, society and its law-makers have an obligation to lead, and set high expectations for its people.
Allen

An action promulgated out of desperation will inevitably end in tragedy; for as its anagram so aptly foretells:  A rope ends it. �

witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #367 on: June 28, 2008, 04:47 PM »
To me it is the parents that fuel racism. It seems to get passed down through the generations. Once people have children of their own, and those children aren't influenced by Grandma or Aunt Biddy, then perhaps the children can learn to accept people for people and not perpetuate the evils.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #368 on: June 28, 2008, 09:19 PM »
Allen, the operative words of your sentence are 'enlightened' and 'choice'. You are so right!! If only we could develop a society that does not fear doing either.
Unfortunately we still have narcissistic organizations that breed racism, but it 'ain't' as bad as it was.

Witt, you defined precisely how racism is perpetuated. It's taught. We are all born innocent to such hate and nonsense and its shameful how one generation after another passes it on.


Quote
"The false teachers of churchianity justify interracial marriages in order to keep the White race blind to administering God's laws."--KKK

I need some help on this one. The only thing I can think of is not all stupid people are racist, but all racists are stupid people.

**Update**
I found this quote by Eric Hoffer who was a U. S. philosopher. He was speaking on the human condition:
Quote
Sometimes we feel the loss of a prejudice as a loss of vigor.


This helps me to better understand the KKK quote.
I haven't the mental capacity to grasp the inner workings of the racist mind, but it seems Hoffer is saying there are those that are energized by prejudice.
Racism feeds on itself, but I can see where Hoffer is also implying that prejudice makes one lazy. After all how much work or effort does one have to put into preconcieved notions? One doesn't have to bother to think about the positives of other cultures. Its easier for the racist to invigorate himself by not having to inconvenience himself with the art of thinking, and assigning the same qualities to others that he sees in himself.
Which brings me back to my original conclusion, right?

Quote
All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will, to be rightful, must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal laws must protect, and to violate would be oppression.� --Thomas Jefferson

It never ceases to amaze me that such stalwart citizens could recognize the need for freedom and constitutionally assigned rights for themselves, but could not see the outrage of owning slaves.


Quote
"Don't be in a hurry to condemn because he doesn't do what you do or think as you think or as fast. There was a time when you didn't know what you know today."---Malcom X

One can connect the dots from slavery to modern times with this quote. Every vestige of humanity was stripped from the slave, yet he was condemned for not being human. But what was it in the lack of the slave holder's own humanity that he did not know?

Women condemned as too weak or uneducated to vote. Condemned, even in our day, as mere sex objects to be owned, but what is it in the sexist he does not know that allows such feelings?

Segregation, classism, oppression, lynchings, the glass ceiling, ...all the things that were designed and implemented to keep minorities down, a step behind and ignorant. Yet because the results of the designed systems of oppression manifests itself in real people trying to catch up, they are condemned as being too slow, unworthy, or dumb. Yet, what is it in those that designed and perpetuated the racists systems they do not know that allows them to revel in the pathetic conditions they created?
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #369 on: June 29, 2008, 01:30 PM »
I put this in the Sweet & Short section, but I think that it fits appropriately here as well.

The blind see what they want to see.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #370 on: June 30, 2008, 05:23 PM »
June Jordan (1936-2003) was a poet, civil rights activist, Prof. of African american studies at Berkley University, Director of English and Poetry Director of The Poetry Center at Stony Brook, and she was in the English faculty at City College of New York, Yale University, Sarah Lawrence College, Connecticut College.

From those credentials I give you this quote:
Quote
In America, the traditional routes to black identity have hardly been normal. Suicide (disappearance by imitation, or willed extinction), violence (hysterical religiosity, crime, armed revolt), and exemplary moral courage; none of these is normal.

Ohh the essays I could write from this.

Anybody get the meaning of what she's saying? I'm open for any dialogue on this one.

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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #371 on: June 30, 2008, 05:34 PM »
Quote
The common goal of 22 million Afro-Americans is respect as human beings, the God-given right to be a human being. Our common goal is to obtain the human rights that America has been denying us. We can never get civil rights in America until our human rights are first restored. We will never be recognized as citizens there until we are first recognized as humans.
Malcolm X

All the blood, deaths, and sacrifices made by generations of black men, women and children on the precipice of being wasted by this generation's lack of knoweldge about where they came from.
Black on Black crime, this filthy Hip-Hop culture, drugs, the ritualization and glorification of our young women as sex objects...just on and on.
How do we ask others to respect us, if 'we' don't respect ourselves?
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #372 on: July 10, 2008, 05:11 PM »
http://www.inrich.com/cva/ric/news.apx.-content-articles-RTD-2008-07-09-0228.html

A link to the chronological events leading to Brown V. Board of education including real time audio and newspaper clips:

http://www.vahistory.org/massive.resistance/documents.html

Justice delayed to one, means it could happen to any one of us. One cannot change what has already happened, but one can show contrition at any point in time for the sake of healing. Contrition has no staute of limitations and, when it happens, it should be recgonized and applauded.
Here is just such an event. I missed this article from 2005:

http://voanews.com/english/archive/2005-09/2005-09-28-voa41.cfm?CFID=35573286&CFTOKEN=91219152
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #373 on: July 10, 2008, 07:37 PM »
"One cannot change what has already happened, but one can show contrition at any point in time for the sake of healing. Contrition has no staute of limitations and, when it happens, it should be recgonized and applauded."

Truer words have never been spoken!

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #374 on: July 11, 2008, 02:01 PM »
Thank you for the feedback my dear Witt.  Sometimes I wonder if I'm saying things the right way to reach the heart. It's nice to see that once in a great while I succeed. Ohhhh to have the linguistic skills of an English professor.
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Offline cappy

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Re: Black History
« Reply #375 on: July 12, 2008, 02:27 AM »
I too remember the debacle well. At the same time Lynchburg closed all of the public pools and filled them with fill dirt rather than de-segregate the pools. There were two Olympic sized pools white only and one much smaller pool that was for “coloreds” but whites could go there if they wanted too.

The scars on the landscape still exist in the Riverside Park where part of the aqua-blue wall whites only pool protrudes above ground resembling a tombstone. It serves as a constant reminder of the cruelty of an era not that far in the past. Several of my classmates where turned away on a July 4 holiday where the pool was to be opened and hot dogs served as a celebration. But that was meant only for whites.

Later during the summer a “colored” boy drowned in the James River at a local watering hole. The local newspaper took great pleasure in blaming the NAACP and local meddlers for causing the drowning of the child. After all if they had not tried to enter the whites only pool then the pools would not have been closed and the little boy would have had a place to swim. This editorial was agreed too by the then city manager. By the way no sympathy was expressed to the parents of the drowned boy.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Black History
« Reply #376 on: July 12, 2008, 03:13 PM »
Thanks for the post Cappy. This is real history.

I found this link this morning. It has pictures in real time at the County seat in Farmville, Va.
The article is short, but the pictures sets the mood of the times.

http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whoweare/exhibits/brown/decision.htm
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witt

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Re: Black History
« Reply #377 on: July 12, 2008, 03:23 PM »
Thanks, cappy, for the reminder. I practically grew up at the public pool. Or, should I say that I'm lucky that I grew up at all because I usually stayed at the bottom of the pool, so my mom tells me. She was always having to fish me out. I finally did learn to swim, however and was there at the pool every chance that I got. Every morning and every afternoon. We had to rest at lunch time due to polio. (That was before the vaccine. That dates me, doesn't it?)
Anyway, our town did the same thing. They filled over the pool for the same reason. I remember crying and crying. I couldn't understand why because I sure didn't mind who came to swim. We could all play together. To this day when I go back home for a visit, I drive by where the old pool was and wish that people didn't have such hate in their hearts. The children sure didn't!