Author Topic: Where Did THAT Come From?  (Read 4648 times)

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Offline elise

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #14 on: January 10, 2014, 02:40 AM »
"THAT'S ALL SHE WROTE!"

This is very much an American expression.  The phrase is used to convey the meaning of 'it's all over; there's no more to be said'. When seeking the expression's origin it would help to know who 'she' was and what exactly it was that she wrote. As we shall see, and as so often with etymology, that's not entirely clear.

The popular version of the origin of this expression is that it is the punch line of a mournful tale about an American GI serving overseas in WWII. The said sad serviceman is supposed to have received a letter from his sweetheart. He reads it to his colleagues: "Dear John". Well, go on, they say. "That's it; that's all she wrote". The story is plausible; 'Dear John' was the standard cipher amongst the US military for the kind of letter that has now been replaced by a 'you're so dumped' text message.

I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2014, 04:35 PM »
I just had to laugh at " you're so dumped."
Makes dear John seem so innocuous now
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2014, 08:28 PM »
Not worth a grain of salt:

This misstatement is likely caused by a mix-up between two common phrases: "worth his salt" and "with a grain of salt." The former refers to a person who is deemed of good stock and fine, upstanding character. Early Roman soldiers earned an allowance of salt for their efforts, and a soldier who was "worth his salt" was one whose performance was up to snuff. (The Latin word for this allowance, salarium, is where we derive the word salary) [source: Mussulman].

The latter phrase means to accept a statement while remaining skeptical about whether it's actually true. It refers to the idea that food is more easily swallowed when taken with a tiny bit of salt [source: The Phrase Finder].
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Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #17 on: March 18, 2014, 07:25 PM »
"All intents and purposes" is a 500-year-old turn of phrase coined in an English Act of Parliament by King Henry VIII. It actually stated, "to all intents, constructions and purposes" and meant "in every practical sense." It was shortened to the popular version in 1709.

The butchered form -- "all intensive purposes" -- sounds similar, which is probably the reason it's been popping up in newspapers and everyday speech since as early as 1870 [sources: Expect Labs, Safire].
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Offline A_Mourning_Glory

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #18 on: March 30, 2014, 03:57 AM »
"THAT GUY'S O.K."

I learned this from the movie, Silver Linings Playbook, as quoted here the words of Pat played by Bradley Cooper...

"Pat: Here's a fun fact. You know where the term 'OK' comes from?
Veronica: No. No, I don't.
Ronnie: Where?
Pat: Well, Martin Van Buren, the eighth President of the United States of America, is from Kinderhook, New York...
Veronica: Oh.
Pat: ...and he was part of a club, a men's club, called Old Kinderhook. And if you were cool,
 you were in the club, they'd say, "That guy's OK." Cause he was in the Old Kinderhooks."
"I thought I'd begin by reading a poem by Shakespeare, but then I thought, why should I? He never reads any of mine."
....Spike Milligan (1918-2002)...

Offline daisyxo

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #19 on: August 12, 2018, 12:03 AM »

Read the Riot Act

These days, angry parents might threaten to “read the riot act” to their unruly children. But in 18th-century England, the Riot Act was a very real document, and it was often recited aloud to angry mobs. Instituted in 1715, the Riot Act gave the British government the authority to label any group of more than 12 people a threat to the peace. In these circumstances, a public official would read a small portion of the Riot Act and order the people to “disperse themselves, and peaceably depart to their habitations.” Anyone that remained after one hour was subject to arrest or removal by force. The law was later put to the test in 1819 during the infamous Peterloo Massacre, in which a cavalry unit attacked a large group of protestors after they appeared to ignore a reading of the Riot Act.
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline daisyxo

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #20 on: September 15, 2019, 08:37 PM »
The phrase “paint the town red” most likely owes its origin to one legendary night of drunkenness. In 1837, the Marquis of Waterford—a known lush and mischief maker—led a group of friends on a night of drinking through the English town of Melton Mowbray. The bender culminated in vandalism after Waterford and his fellow revelers knocked over flowerpots, pulled knockers off of doors and broke the windows of some of the town’s buildings. To top it all off, the mob literally painted a tollgate, the doors of several homes and a swan statue with red paint. The marquis and his pranksters later compensated Melton for the damages, but their drunken escapade is likely the reason that “paint the town red” became shorthand for a wild night out. Still yet another theory suggests the phrase was actually born out of the brothels of the American West, and referred to men behaving as though their whole town were a red-light district.
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline daisyxo

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #21 on: September 15, 2019, 08:40 PM »
These are old "sayings" and where they originated from …. take a glance at the ones we've done already, and jump in.  Google "old sayings and where they came from" to get some ideas to share.  These are fun tidbits and may just clear up some curiosity you've had in the past.
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline daisyxo

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #22 on: September 21, 2019, 11:46 PM »
For Pete's Sake:

Originated as substitutes for something stronger—“for Christ's sake,” “for God's sake,” “for the love of God,” and so on. The Oxford English Dictionary explains that the name “Pete” in these exclamations is chiefly “a euphemistic replacement” for God.
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline Halo

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #23 on: September 22, 2019, 03:14 AM »
 :coffee

Didn't know that.
Be careful of your thoughts; they may become words at any moment.  ~  Ira Gassen

Offline elise

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Re: Where Did THAT Come From?
« Reply #24 on: September 23, 2019, 05:11 AM »
"Bless your heart" is a phrase that is common in the Southern United States. The phrase has multiple meanings. It can be used as a sincere expression of sympathy or genuine concern. It can be used as a precursor to an insult to soften the blow.

Oh and having family in Alabama...it can often be followed with "How's your Mama?"   It seems to not be a sincere question, but just a conversation starter.


I felt it shelter to speak to you  ~Emily Dickinson