Author Topic: What's On Your Playlist?  (Read 12801 times)

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Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #266 on: May 22, 2012, 02:45 PM »
Bee Gees - How Can You Mend A Broken Heart (live, 1997)
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #267 on: May 22, 2012, 04:22 PM »
We've lost some great ones the last few weeks G. Looks like it comes in threes.
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #268 on: May 31, 2012, 09:40 AM »
We've lost some great ones the last few weeks G. Looks like it comes in threes.


Sometimes, it comes in fours...

Legendary Folk Guitarist Dies At Age 89

Doc Watson
March 3, 1923 - May 29, 2012


Doc Watson-Deep River Blues


In 1962, Doc Watson and some of his musician neighbors set out from their home in the Blue Ridge Mountains on the journey of a lifetime, to perform at the Ash Grove folk club in Los Angeles.

"I remember the first trip we did," Watson said in a 2008 interview. "We borrowed a little station wagon from the late Clarence Ashley's son and drove to California and back, and I remember thinking, 'Lord, what a big old country this is.' I was a mountaineer, just a country boy. I'd never been nowhere like that before."

Within a few years, Watson seemingly had been everywhere, as his prowess on guitar and his vast store of traditional Southern music made the blind musician an internationally celebrated artist.

Watson, 89, who recorded more than 50 albums and won seven Grammy Awards, died Tuesday at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., according to his representatives at Folklore Productions, a Santa Monica management company. He had undergone colon surgery Thursday.

Although Watson is perhaps most acclaimed for his astonishing technique in both the flat-pick and finger-picking styles, his greatest contribution touched on broader concerns.

"Doc arrived at a point where there was the beginning of an audience for traditional music, but not really an informed group of people," Ash Grove owner Ed Pearl said last week.

"Doc was by far the best traditional artist I ever met at talking openly about his people, and just having a casual conversation with an audience.… He was among the most versatile and un-self-conscious bringers of Southern white culture to the Ash Grove possible, and he did that right from the beginning."

With his natural ease as a storyteller, his heartfelt baritone singing, his repository of material and his facility on guitar, Watson was a rare combination of authenticity and artistry.

His example inspired a generation of musicians to explore obscure musical pockets, as well as to upgrade their instrumental technique toward the remarkably high standards he established. He is one of the prime sources of the hybrid, roots-conscious Americana genre, and a key influence on such noted players as Norman Blake, Tony Rice, Buddy Miller and Dan Crary.

"Doc Watson sort of defined in many ways what Americana has become," Jed Hilly, executive director of the Americana Music Assn., told The Times. "He played different styles of American roots music. He played traditional country, he played what would be traditional folk, he played what was traditional bluegrass, he played gospel. All those elements sort of interwoven, that's what Buddy Miller does today.… Nothing is more definitive than Doc Watson's appreciation for a broad spectrum of music in the Americana world."

Watson received a National Medal of Arts in 1997 and a lifetime achievement award from the Recording Academy in 2004.

Remarkably, Watson was well into his 40s when he embarked on a serious music career.

Arthel Lane Watson was born March 3, 1923, one of nine children in a farming family in Deep Gap, N.C. Blinded by an eye infection before he was 2, he was encouraged by his father to be active on the farm. His father also helped foster his musical leanings.

Arthel received a new harmonica every Christmas; and when he was 11 his father made him a banjo, with the head formed from the skin of the family's recently deceased cat. He got his first guitar at 13 and steeped himself in the music he heard on the Grand Ole Opry radio broadcasts and records by such country pioneers as Jimmie Rodgers and the Carter Family.

Watson and his brother Linney played on street corners in nearby Boone, and he later played in local country bands, developing a style influenced by Merle Travis, Eddy Arnold and Chet Atkins. He also tuned pianos to help support a new family — in 1947 he married his teenage cousin Rosa Lee Carlton, daughter of noted fiddler Gaither Carlton. Watson's new in-law helped him stockpile his repertoire of traditional songs.

Nicknamed Doc by an announcer at a radio station where his group sometimes played, Watson joined a dance band in 1953, adding his electric guitar to its mix of country, pop, swing and square dance music. He had tried to play fiddle but was dissatisfied with his bowing skill, so he began to play the up-tempo fiddle leads on his Les Paul, a la Nashville session stars Grady Martin and Riley Puckett.

For Watson, the traditional acoustic music remained a private passion, so he was intrigued in the late 1950s when the Kingston Trio and other big-city singers began to find success interpreting the old songs.

But his own breakthrough came by accident. Musician and folklorist Ralph Rinzler traveled to the South to record old-time singer and banjo player Clarence "Tom" Ashley, who recruited some neighbors, including Watson, for the session. Watson had to borrow a friend's Gibson because he didn't own an acoustic guitar.

The recordings stirred up some interest, and Rinzler took the players to New York for a concert at Town Hall that helped coalesce the growing folk audience. Watson also got a booking at Gerde's Folk City in Greenwich Village; and in 1962 Watson, Ashley and company headed west for their first Ash Grove engagement. They also played key folk festivals, including those at Newport, R.I., and UCLA.

Watson eventually followed Rinzler's advice and emerged as a solo performer, though he was soon accompanied regularly by his guitarist son, Merle. For Watson, the career offered an opportunity to pull his weight and support his family, and one of his proudest moments was informing a North Carolina state agency that he no longer needed financial assistance for the blind.

It all came to a temporary halt when Merle was killed in a tractor accident in 1985, but after a hiatus Watson returned to the road. In 1988 he organized MerleFest, an informal folk music gathering in Wilkesboro, N.C., that has grown into one of the country's major folk festivals.

Watson, who recorded for a variety of record labels, disliked touring because it kept him away from his home and family, and he first announced his retirement from the road in 1988. He gradually cut back on his schedule but continued to play occasional concerts.

On "Legacy," a 2002 recording of music and conversation with Watson and musician David Holt, Watson is asked how he'd like to be remembered.

"Just as a good old, down-to-earth boy that didn't think he was perfect and that loved music," he says. "And I'd like to leave quite a few friends behind.... Other than that, I don't want anybody putting me on a pedestal when I leave here. I'm just one of the people."

Besides his wife of nearly 66 years, Watson is survived by his daughter Nancy Ellen, two grandchildren, several great-grandchildren and a brother, David.

~ Richard Cromelin, Los Angeles Times May 30, 2012


I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #269 on: July 08, 2012, 10:39 AM »
The Naming of Cats in T S Eliot's own voice
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #270 on: July 08, 2012, 10:40 AM »
Cats the naming of cats (Original Broadway cast)
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #271 on: July 13, 2012, 05:04 PM »
Number One July 13, 1957:

Elvis Presley - Teddy Bear
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Halo

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #272 on: July 13, 2012, 09:47 PM »





Be careful of your thoughts; they may become words at any moment.  ~  Ira Gassen

Offline cafeRg

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #273 on: July 14, 2012, 06:26 AM »


Hey I saw that dude, here in Jackson, leaving the white trash diner  :tongue


Long Live da King!
Disclaimer: cafeRg could be wrong.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #274 on: July 14, 2012, 12:58 PM »
There are only three things that will survive a nuclear holocaust:

1. Cockroaches

2. Twinkies

3. Elvis
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #275 on: July 14, 2012, 07:00 PM »
Paco de Lucia Concierto de Aranjuez( completo)all 3 movements

Paco de Lucía is inarguably one of the most iconic artists today, and one of the few remaining living legends who represents a musical culture and heritage which – outside of Spain – has remained relatively obscure, and little understood. He is known worldwide as the master of flamenco guitar. Perhaps much of what is not known about him is what makes De Lucía stand out among those rarest geniuses of contemporary music, a distinction he earned early in his illustrious 50 year career, and one which remains as relevant today as it did when he first performed in New York, at the age of 14, accompanying Jose Greco’s highly stylized cabaret flamenco popular in the USA during the early 1960’s. De Lucía would soon return to make his own solo debut at Carnegie Hall in 1970, when he was just 23 years old. That was the beginning of a historic musical trajectory that would span over 1 million record sales, 24 albums, and 1 Grammy Award.
Francisco Sánchez Gómez, a classically untrained guitarist who never learned to read music, was born in 1947 in Algeciras, a port city in the southernmost Spanish province of Cádiz, Andalucia. The progeny of a passionately musical family, De Lucía was an extremely quiet, introverted boy who learned to play guitar by ear, surrounded by the constant music of the deeply rooted gypsy neighborhood where his family lived. His father was a guitarist and composer, and his two brothers – Ramon de Algeciras and Pepe de Lucía– ultimately became esteemed flamenco musicians as adults. Paco (the Spanish nickname for Francisco) de Lucía (literally “of Lucia”, in reference to his Portuguese mother, Lucía Gómez) was extremely close to his brothers, and was greatly influenced by them. He credits both his father, and his elder brother, Ramon, for teaching him the basics of playing guitar, the ideal refuge for the sensitive, shy boy who quickly learned to distinguish the complex rhythmical styles, known as “palos”, and instrumental melodies or “falsetas”, the foundations of flamenco composition. His parents realized that the pure, natural talent of young Paco presented a potential source of income given the economic hardship gripping Spain during the 1950’s Franco regime, and soon he was working to help support his family, performing local shows with his singer brother, Pepe, and guitarist Ramon, when he was only seven years old. Looking back, De Lucía considers it a blessing to have been able to help his family survive by playing an instrument that he had spent countless hours practicing in isolation; little did he realize that he was destined to also revolutionize the entire spectrum of flamenco as it had existed for over 150 years, nor that he would be the greatest innovator that it has ever known, and the one who would bring it to an international mass audience.
Following his development from child prodigy to touring ensemble musician, De Lucía returned to Spain to launch his professional recording career, at first remaining true to the tradition of the classical masters. Drawing from the advice given to him years earlier in New York by one of his idols and the reigning master of flamenco guitar at the time, the great Sabicas, who told him “a true flamenco should not play the music of others, but rather, he should create his own”, De Lucía began distancing himself from the old masters, defining his own personal style and brazenly showcasing his dazzling, impeccable virtuosity on “La Fabulosa Guitarra de Paco de Lucía” in 1967, and 1969’s “Fantasia Flamenca”.
The turning point in his career came in 1968, when De Lucía crossed paths with kindred renaissance man and vanguardist, Camarón de la Isla, a young gypsy singer who also hailed from Cadiz. Camarón - with his powerful, almost savage vocal range and savant sense of harmony - instantly became – and still is to this day – De Lucía’s greatest inspiration. Their attraction was mutual, spontaneous and irrepressible. The musical chemistry and intense creativity between the two was transcendent and prolific. These were the golden years of flamenco for Paco and Camaron, and together they composed and released nine albums between 1969 and 1977, touring extensively throughout Spain and establishing the duo as the superstars of the Nuevo Flamenco generation. They collaborated for the last time in 1991 on “Potro de Rabia y Miel”, widely regarded by aficionados as their masterpiece, shortly before Camaron's untimely death in July 1992.
Fueled by this visionary, artistic partnership, De Lucía’s focus on his solo career intensified, pushing himself – along with the boundaries of flamenco - towards the pursuit of even more unconventional musical evolution and unorthodox fusions.
This yearning for innovation led DeLucia to the formation of the Guitar Trio in 1979, alongside jazz greats John McLaughlin and Larry Coryell, later replaced by Al Di Meola. This experience was as inspiring as it was terrifying for De Lucía, who had to learn to improvise by keeping up with the freestyling virtuosos, live on stage. De Lucía remembers this period vividly, describing it as “being on a speeding train and seeing sign posts whizzing by, and by the time you’ve figured out what the first one says, 20 more have passed you by.” In hindsight, De Lucía credits his tenacity and respect for musical evolution as the driving force which kept him from abandoning this daunting challenge - one he had never before faced - and on December 5, 1980 the first avant-garde style of flamenco jazz was forged, on “Friday Night in San Francisco”.
In 1981 he formed the Paco de Lucía Sextet, the first flamenco concept band of its kind, incorporating instrumentation ranging from electric bass, saxophone and flute, along with the now ubiquitous box-shaped cajón – which De Lucía first discovered during a trip to Peru in the late 70’s, and brought back to Spain, proclaiming it to be the essential percussion instrument with which to accompany flamenco guitar - a radical idea at the time - and one which would change the sound of flamenco forever. The original Sextet – which included his brothers, guitarist Ramon de Algeciras and singer Pepe de Lucía, along with Brazilian master percussionist Rubem Dantas, legendary jazz/flamenco bassist Carles Benavent, and Jorge Pardo on flute/saxophone - was De Lucía’s best, and favorite band. They recorded three groundbreaking albums together: “Zyryab” (1990), and two live albums, “One Summer Night” (1984), and “Live in America” (1993). Those were the first flamenco records that blended acoustic flamenco tinged with jazz improvisations, the culmination of De Lucía’s aesthetic ideals.
“That’s where it all began, we broke the mold,” says De Lucía on the “Making of” DVD which accompanies his upcoming CD release EnVivo: Conciertos España 2010. EnVivo is De Lucía’s 25th recording, and only his fourth live album. “Competing with those records is difficult, but on this record what we’re trying to capture is a new perspective of another time, a new time. The energy created during a live performance can never be created in a studio, that’s where the soul of the music is most likely to appear – live on stage.”
Comprised of live concert recordings during his extensive tour of Spain in 2010, this CD presents a more profound De Lucía – an artist who has reached the peak of his artistic maturity. The new version of the now septet features De Lucía’s handpicked lineup of musicians, some of whom have been touring with him since 2004’s Grammy winning “Cositas Buenas”: Cuban electric latin/jazz bassist, Alain Perez; percussionist Israel Suarez Escobar “Piraña”; virtuoso harmonica/keyboard player Antonio Serrano; the renowned singer “Duquende” ; De Lucía’s nephew Antonio Sanchez on 2nd guitar; vocalist David de Jacoba; and Farruco, the up and coming dancer and descendant of a famous flamenco dynasty.
De Lucía’s greatest challenge now is to surround himself with musicians who inspire him enough to let them be his inspiration. “For a musician to perform live on stage requires giving him 100% freedom to be himself, that’s what I like the most - to have musicians who have good rhythm, sensitivity, if they have a good sense of harmony it’s even better, but above all – I like them to be good people”.
A self-described anarchist, De Lucía goes further: “I go on stage to realize myself, to express the best that I have inside of me – that’s why I recorded these seven concerts – because I’m hoping to surprise myself. I tend to take a long time making records. It’s not just a new idea that I’m looking for, or a new song. It’s the sensation of always looking for the unexpected, and the surprise of finding it – it’s very complicated.” Ultimately, De Lucía says he plays for other flamenco guitarists, “They are the ones who understand what I do.”
Perhaps the best way to capture what “EnVivo” represents to De Lucía is summed up by his acute observation : “On a live record you don’t expect perfection from beginning to end; what you want is for there to be emotion, and light. When you play live there is no trickery, no deception; when you play live, it is who and what you are.”
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #276 on: July 15, 2012, 05:19 AM »
I HAS to do it...I can't stop Meself...

Sesame Street: Share It Maybe


Me got a wish on me mind
It is a chocolate chip kind
Me look at you and me tell
You may have Snickerdoodle
Me trade me soul for a bite
Me spell it out Black and White
Me look at you and me see
You like an elf in a tree

You, cookie-showing, and me hunger growing
Let’s get skim milk flowing
We’ll start this snack going baby

Hey, me just met you
And this is crazy
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

It hard to look at
Your snack baby
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Hey, me just met you
And this is crazy
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Cuppy-cake with frosting
It no phase me
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

You took you time with the bite
Me trying to stay polite
Me start to really freak out
Please someone call the Girl Scout

Me no grumble or grouse
It’s taking toll on me house
Me going off me rocker
Please feed me Betty Crocker

You, cookie-showing, and me hunger growing
Let’s get skim milk flowing
We’ll start this snack going baby

Hey, me just met you
And this is crazy
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

It hard to look at
You snack baby
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Hey, me just met you
And this is crazy
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Pie and ice cream
It no phase me
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Before you came into me life
Me missed you so bad,
Me missed you so bad,
Me missed you so, so bad

Before you came into me life
Me missed you so bad,
And you should know that,
Me missed you so, so bad
Bad… bad… bad… bad…

It hard to look at your snack, baby
But you got cookie, so share it maybe

Hey, me just met you
And this is crazy
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Chocolate pudding
It no phase me
But you got cookie
So share it maybe

Cookie! Yum yum yum. Thank you. MMMMMM MMMMMM MMMM Here.
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline A-FRIEND

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #277 on: July 15, 2012, 01:22 PM »
cookie monster is my hero
Stop looking at the light. Instead, look at what is being illuminated by the light.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #278 on: July 19, 2012, 02:17 AM »
Paco de Lucia - Rio Ancho
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.

Offline Mystic1

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Re: What's On Your Playlist?
« Reply #279 on: July 22, 2012, 04:34 AM »
JULIAN SMITH - Buffering


:tongue
I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not for our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex.