Author Topic: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd  (Read 11261 times)

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Offline Soft Words

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Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« on: April 08, 2007, 01:48 PM »
[float=left]2013-0[/float]I went on a long walk to the railroads the other day, and look who I found - Dana Rowe a.k.a. Gaerllwyd. He is a man of many hats - former soldier, teacher, journalist, railroad conductor, poet.  That last is something that is really beautiful because his poetry is picturesque. He loves to talk to people, and would love to find a way to stop time so he can talk to his heart's content, I think. :)

Soft Words: What brought your marching boots to SplashHall?
Gaerllwyd: Curiosity.  I'd seen SplashHall mentioned on the IBPC and clicked on the link.  Voila!  I liked what I saw and decided to contribute a few and see what happened.

Soft Words: What keeps you here?
Gaerllwyd: Simple:  it's interesting.

Soft Words: Which are your favorite forum(s)?
Gaerllwyd: This one.  I like the profiles you folks write.  I get to find out all about the people whose posts I read, and this is great, since I have a big curiosity factor.  Of course that comes from all the time I spent in journalism.  But then, I probably was a journalist because it legitimized my natural nosiness.  I like the ax because I like seeing what people think about what I write and getting ideas about how to edit what I've written.  You can get locked into your own words, so hearing from other writers is a big enlightenment.  I like Wax because of the interplay and discussions.  And of course, you would really want to ask me in, say, a year after I've really had time to sample all the rest.

Soft Words: Who are your favorite Splashers?
Gaerllwyd: That's not an easy question to answer this early in the game.  I enjoy dialog with Street.  Witt is always interesting.  Common interests of maritime interest with Balladeer.  I'm sure I'd be including many more a little further in the game as I get to know them.  No negative personalities on my radar screen, yet.  Ahh, yes, and isn't there always a "yet"?????  But I'm not looking for any.

Soft Words: Favorite authors/poets (outside Splash)?
Gaerllwyd: So many authors to name . . . so little time.  And it just bollixes up the  mind when I try to think of them because they all swim together so quickly.  Ernie Pyle, the great World War II Journalist had a way with words that was so simple it is incomparable.  Samuel Taylor Coleridge.  Certainly the Beowulf poet.  Heinlein, Herbert, Asimov, Michael Coney and Roddenberry.
Basho, Jakushitsu.  Frost, eecummings and Langston Hughes.  I have to stop.  But Yeats, John Millington Synge . . . Samuel Beckett and  William Saroyan, somebody stop me!   Steinbeck, Twain, Poe and Dickens;  Donne,  Taliesin and Robert W. Service.  I could go on forever, but I won't.  This is the cream at the top of the bottle, anyway.  Did I mention Geoffrey Chaucer . . .

Soft Words: What are your other interests, hobbies and passions?
Gaerllwyd: Heh.  You think I have time for interests, hobbies passions after all this?  Well genealogy certainly fills my waning extra hours.  Between school all winter I have my passion for railroading all summer.  It's a true passion, as I dearly love taking my trains out onto the main.  In fact, I got to do a cameo of myself as myself -- the conductor -- in a movie starring David Carradine, Bruce Dern, Rip Torn and Marielle Hemingway.  If I don't end up on the cutting room floor I'll be there for 30 seconds max.  But they rented our train and needed a conductor who looked like me, so I got the role.  I also like to go out to open mics and read my work aloud.  I also spend the winter as a fanatic who heats his entire house with wood.  The furnace hasn't run in over two years here at the house.  I burn mostly pallets from pallet dumps I've discovered around the city.

Soft Words: Is your username a reflection of your liking of Welsh poetry?
Gaerllwyd: I had the name before I discovered the Welsh forms.  I was investigating southeast corner of Wales and there was this village by the name, which means grey fortress.  Welsh and Irish poetry of the Middle Ages tended to the bardic, a storytelling form.  Poets were raised to part of the king's court and educated and groomed for the position for years.  For some time, I've been using the different Welsh styles to write.  My original contact with the Welsh formats came from a close friend who is also a poet.

Soft Words: If you were given a chance to change any part of history, what would you change?
Gaerllwyd: I'd bring back Jack and Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King.  Also  Jim Morrison, Hendrix, Janis, John Lennon and Patsy Cline.  My generation was stripped of its leaders and its inspiration.  I find it hard to imagine what we might be like had JFK been an 8-yer president or had Bobby become president.  How would we think today, had Rev. King lived on?  And I sure do miss the sound of those fine musicians who carried us through the tough period after those individuals were wrenched from us by the hand of fate.

Soft Words: You've seen a lot of ups and downs in your life, some personal, some you've seen up-close. How much has your perspective on life changed thanks to these?
Gaerllwyd:  I'm more circumspect about things.  Taking them at face value isn't in my vocabulary any longer.  More critical of the status quo.  I want all the cards on the table, now.  But I still have the need to have that up-close experience and sensationalism just doesn't appeal to me.  Haven't seen Mel Gibson's "Passion" nor have I seen "The Exorcist".  Ehhh.  Life has more excitement -- experience it.

Soft Words: You're dabbling in a lot of different poetry styles. Tell me where you discover forms like the Burmese than-bauk (and a little about the forms themselves)
Gaerllwyd: Search engines.  Don't laugh.  My friend Terry Clitheroe, an Ozzie from Melbourne runs a fine site for finding out at www.thepoetsgarret.com (did I mention that already?)  However, I've now shown him Burmese, Cambodian and Filipino forms.  I found the Vietnamese  Luc Bat on his site.  Then I went to Altavista.com and put in Cambodian Poetry and discovered the pathya-vat.  The Burma search produced than-bauk and Ya-Du.  I'm working at digesting the very complex scheme of Thai forms.  It's all there, just need to ask a search engine to find it.  And I search whatever my curiosity requires.  I think that's the thing.  My idea about poetry is -- as opposed to prose -- that it's a need to constantly seek out.  So, it's a choice to take the machete and cut my way through the jungle.  Yesterday I was doing just that and discovered one of my old cars I'd forgotten all about in my side yard.

Soft Words: "To explain all is the purpose of prose.  To elicit emotive response is the purpose of poetry." Which poems have evoked the strongest emotions for you?
Gaerllwyd: Oh, noooooooo!  You're asking me to compile another of those long lists.  Well, certainly "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner".  Tennyson's translation of "The Battle of Brunanburh".  John McCutcheon's lyrics to "Christmas in the Trenches" puts me on an incredible emotional roller coaster.  eecummings' "I  Sing of Olaf" is another.  William Butler Yeats does it to me.  And I'm going to stop, now, before I do as bad a job of stopping myself as I did earlier.  Oh, yeah, and the lyrics for The Pogues' "The Band Played Waltzing Matilda."  See what I mean?  Must stop.

Soft Words: You're a published writer of a number of articles on various fields, you teach, you've been a railroad conductor, you're a poet – what would you like to be remembered as?
Gaerllwyd: Somebody's going to remember this wild, old man?  I suppose I'd want to be recalled as somebody who, despite the trail or wreckage strewn in his wake, was searching for enlightenment.

Soft Words: Any suggestions you might have for our sweet Rg to improve on your Splashing experience?
Gaerllwyd:  As long-winded as I've been, I can't think of anything.

Soft Words: Anything special you'd like to say to everyone here?
Gaerllwyd: Sure:  (waving [grin])  HEYAS!
Life isn't about waiting for the storms to pass, it's about learning to dance in the rain.

Offline Kay

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2007, 02:15 PM »
Gaerllwyd


I enjoyed getting to know you a little more.
You sure are a versatile poet. We are glad you are here. Thanks for doing the interview for us.

 :rose

Offline WordFaery

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2007, 02:26 PM »
Happy to know you.   :)
"Come Fairies, take me out of this dull world for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame."      W.B. Yeats



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Offline GaerLlwyd

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2007, 03:53 PM »
Kay:

Thanks.

I spent about 7 years doing racer profiles for the program at our local speedway (Seekonk Speedway, Seekonk, Mass.) and now the tables have been turned.  It was an interesting turn of the screw, a look from the opposite direction and a real pleasure.

GL

Offline GaerLlwyd

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2007, 03:56 PM »
Faery:

[Tipping the conductor's hat]:  Likewise!

Gaer

P. S.:  first line from one of my RR poems:

"The moon's on the prairie, arousin' the faerie . . ."

 ;D

Offline WordFaery

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2007, 06:13 PM »
 :dblu
"Come Fairies, take me out of this dull world for I would ride with you upon the wind and dance upon the mountains like a flame."      W.B. Yeats



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Offline daisyxo

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2007, 07:38 PM »
Never stop searching those search engines ... and please share your findings along the way ... happy to meet you Gaer.  Looking forward to reading more.

 :poet
~ Marsha ~
 

"Abilities wither under faultfinding, blossom with encouragement." -- Donald A. Laird

Offline Saxman

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2007, 09:35 PM »
Nice to meet you Gaerllwyd... I too enjoy poetry telling stories from the middle ages.  Knights, dragons, wizards, and kingdoms.
I've enjoyed reading some of your poetry.  I haven't had a chance to comment on many of them yet. I will. 
Welcome and looking forward to getting to know you more, and reading your works..

Sax.....

witt

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #8 on: April 09, 2007, 07:07 AM »
This was MOST enlightening! I enjoyed your lists of writers and entertainers. Seems we have more in common than I would have imagined. I do enjoy your railroad poetry so much. Keep on ridin' the rails and writin'!

Offline nite

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2007, 07:48 AM »
Very nice to know you Gaer,

Great interview, I really enjoyed reading it and finding out more about a fellow splasher.


 :rose

Offline xanadu_poet

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2007, 05:27 PM »
Great interview, Dana

good to know more about you

Christian

 ^-^

Offline GaerLlwyd

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #11 on: April 10, 2007, 08:49 AM »
Daisy:

Equally pleased to meet you.

Never stop searching those search engines ... and please share your findings along the way
 :poet

Started hitting the search engines with the Norse site you gave.  A Northman's poem about railroads, with kennings!  Whoooo!  This will be a chore!  Let's see, that would make me:

Hammer of Steam

Hammer:  reference to Thor; a god; read as captain or commander . . . Steam:  of an engine; a locomotive; read as train . . . hence:  Hammer of Steam = Train Conductor.

This looks to be an enjoyable challenge.  A real brain-knotter.

Thanks for the suggestions.

Gaer

Offline GaerLlwyd

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #12 on: April 10, 2007, 09:10 AM »
Saxman:

Glad to find a fellow aficionado of heroic poetry from the Dark Ages!

Keep blowin' that tenor, and remember what Ernie and Hoots sang:

You gotta put down the duckie
Put down the duckie
Put down the duckie
Yeah, you gotta leave the duck alone
You gotta put down the duckie
Put down the duckie
Put down the duckie
If you wanna play the saxophone!


Gaer



Offline Saxman

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Re: Railroad Man: Gaerllwyd
« Reply #13 on: April 10, 2007, 12:12 PM »
Yes the Dark Ages are one area I love to right about.  Both the romance and the evil of the times.  Magical and mystic times.  It's been along time since I heard the song...LOL.  But it is so true when you have a group just starting out and they have to learn to blow through the mouthpiece...... "Oh God, look out for incoming ducks". That was an quote from my first band instructor..